State comptroller pushes savings program for disabled–Poughkeepsie Journal

Amy Wu

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed NY ABLE into law at the end of 2015. Since its launch in New York, 163 accounts have been opened at an average of two or three a day. Many of those who signed up are 35 and under, although the oldest participants are in their 80s, said Anne Del Plato, who is overseeing the program.

On Tuesday, state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli was in Poughkeepsie to make a push for the program and spoke to a standing-room-only crowd at The Arc of Dutchess, a nonprofit that offers resources and support to the developmentally disabled. Attendees included parents of children with disabilities, caregivers, agencies and nonprofits that focus on the disabled, and a handful of disabled adults

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The program’s requirements include being a state resident and have been diagnosed with a disability before 26.

The program’s key features include:

  • It is tax-free when used with qualified expenses such as education, transportation and personal support services.
  • Accounts can for opened by an individual, parent or guardian with $25 or $15 with payroll deduction.
  • Participants can deposit up to $14,000 annually this year, and $15,000 starting in 2018.
  • The program has a cap of $100,000 for the accounts.

NY ABLE is structured similarly to the state’s 529 College Savings Program, which has more than $27 billion invested currently, DiNapoli said. In addition, the program offers several investment options.

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Group Proposes Changes for How NY Courts Deal with ICE Arrests | New York Law Journal

By Josefa Velasquez and Colby Hamilton

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As arrests at courthouses by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers continue, a report released Tuesday by the Fund for Modern Courts suggests New York’s courts should limit their cooperation and assistance with civil immigration law enforcement.

So far this year ICE agents have arrested 52 people while they were in court in New York state, the majority in New York City, Lucian Chalfen, a spokesman for the Office of Court Administration, told the New York Law Journal Tuesday. This is the first year the state’s court system has tracked ICE activities and arrests in courthouses. Expanded immigration enforcement actions under the Trump administration have resulted in increased arrests at courthouses nationally since the beginning of 2017, the report states.

The 24-page report issued by the justice system reform organization examined the impact of ICE arrests on New Yorkers’ access to state courthouses. It suggested actions that Chief Judge Janet DiFiore should take to mitigate the “negative impact on individuals and the courts resulting from ICE’s actions in courthouses.”

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The iPhone Upgrade Program: A Year in Review – TidBITS

by Josh Centers Send Email to Author 
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Now, to take some of the mystique out of all of this: the iPhone Upgrade Program is actually an interest-free loan administered by Citizens One. Every year, when you order a new iPhone through the program, Citizens One checks your credit (a “hard pull,” which can negatively affect your credit score) and issues you a new loan if you’re approved.

Despite being administered by a third party, the iPhone Upgrade Program has some uniquely Apple pros and cons.

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Read more, including reviews abd comments on Apple iPhone Upgrade…

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Regulation and the Local Food Movement | The Regulatory Review

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The local food movement has been booming over the last several years. The number of farmers’ markets across the country has nearly doubled in the last decade, and a recent Pew Research Center poll found that a majority of people in the United States had bought locally grown produce in the previous month. The enormous interest in eating locally has even led to the coinage of a new word: locavore.

Local food production and consumption offer a variety of benefits, which two legal scholars, Patricia Salkin and Amy Lavine, discuss in a recent paper. Because of these purported benefits, Salkin and Lavine argue that local and state governments should follow the example of some of their peers and update their zoning and land use regulations to encourage more local food production.

Salkin and Lavine tout the advantages of “foodsheds”–geographic areas surrounding urban areas that can provide some of the food that city-dwellers consume. For instance, Salkin and Lavine point to potential environmental benefits: Small farms may use fewer chemicals and produce less waste than large industrial farms. And it requires much less fuel to transport produce to a nearby city than it does to transport produce across the country.

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Illinois and New York Pass First Statewide Bans on the Use of Elephants in Entertainment | Animal Legal Defense Fund

Posted by Nicole Pallotta, Academic Outreach Manager on November 17, 2017

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Soon after, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed New York’s SB 2098B, also known as the “Elephant Protection Act,” into law on October 19, 2017. It amends the state’s Agriculture and Markets Law and its Environmental Conservation Law to prohibit the use of elephants in entertainment acts. The New York law does not specifying “traveling” acts but expressly exempts accredited zoos and aquariums. It takes effect in two years.  In contrast to the Illinois law, which makes violation a Class A misdemeanor, the New York law provides a civil penalty of up to $1,000 for each violation because offenses against animals are not part of New York’s Penal Code.

The legislation was drafted by undergraduate students in Pace University’s Environmental Policy Clinic, who also lobbied for its passage and collected student signatures in support of the bill. Several New York chapters of the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund submitted letters in support of the bill to Governor Cuomo over the summer.

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Depression and the Legal Profession – Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Tips Blog

Jim Calloway:
Did you know that students entering law school have same rate of depression as the general population (approximately 7%), but by the time they finish their first year of law school 34% experience depression? This statistic is from a new book from the ABA, The Full Weight of the Law: How Legal Professionals Can Recognize and Rebound from Depression.
 
I’m no expert, but that statistic indicates something is wrong. It is well documented that lawyers suffer from depression and problems related to stress and depression at rates greater than the general public.

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Dementia Science and the Law | Live & Webcast

This timely program will address the fragility of the human brain and how and by whom capacity determinations are made for and/or on behalf of the millions of adult Americans who have diminished mental capacity, including the estimated five million Americans who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s diseases.  Special emphasis will be placed on the tensions between lawyers and healthcare professionals as to how, where, and by whom such capacity determinations should be made.

Sponsored by the Committee on Continuing Legal Education and Elder Law and Special Needs, Health Law and Senior Lawyers Sections

Thursday, December, 14, 2017

8:30 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.

Live CLE Program & Webcast

The Core Club
66 East 55th Street
New York, NY 10022

4.5 MCLE Credits | 3.5 Professional Practice | 1.0 Ethics

NYSBA Member Price: $135 | Non-member: $235

Co-Sponsoring Section Member: $110

www.nysba.org/DementiaCLE

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Kathleen Plog
New York State Bar Association
kplog@nysba.org (518) 487-5681
Albany, NY

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