Bankruptcy Forms | United States Courts

Revised Bankruptcy Forms Go Into Effect December 1

U.S. Bankruptcy Court filers and lawyers must use new forms beginning December 1, when the first modernization of bankruptcy forms in two decades takes effect.

The forms are available at, and contain major changes in organization, language and numbering. Because the new forms will be mandatory for all new cases, users of the bankruptcy system are being urged to read the forms before the change-over date. 

The new forms are easier for debtors to understand and complete, and are designed to work with scheduled enhancements to the federal courts’ Case Management/Electronic Case Files system. Together the changes will reduce administrative strains, improve delivery of case information to judges, and protect debtor and creditor rights.

Read more about the new bankruptcy forms.

IRS Commissioner: What to Expect at Tax Time – YouTube

Learn how the Affordable Care Act will affect you when you file your tax return. Click here for forms

IRS Commissioner: What to Expect at Tax Time

Information for Employers about Their Responsibilities Under the Affordable Care Act-IRS

Tax Tip Offers Information on Employer Responsibilities under the Affordable Care Act

If you are an employer, the number of employees in your business will affect what you need to know about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to a new IRS Tax Tip. The Tax Tip offers information on applicable large employers, employer shared responsibility provisions of the healthcare law, the small business health care tax credit and business reporting requirements.

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LII / Legal Information Institute

In case you might have forgotten, the Legal Information Institute is still going strong, getting better, and offering more resources every year.

Take advantage of their US Supreme Court services, especially their new Sunday night reminder email, while the Court is in session.

LII on the US Supreme Court

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Know Your Rights: Housing and Arrests or Criminal Convictions | The Bronx Defenders

A criminal history can affect your eligibility for both public housing and, if a landlord conducts a background check, private housing. An arrest – even before anyone is found guilty – can often trigger eviction of you or your entire household from public or private housing.

Federally Subsidized Housing(NYCHA & Section 8)

Federally subsidized housing includes all public housing developments (such as NYCHA in New York City and RHA in Rochester) and Section 8. Rules in subsidized housing can be very strict, and even minor arrests or criminal convictions can affect your right to stay in public housing. This section includes information about “Admissions” – or the rules guiding when your criminal conviction might prevent you from living in public housing, even if your family lives there, and about “Termination of Tenancy” – or eviction based on criminal justice involvement. Most of the information here is specific to the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) and to Section 8 administered by NYCHA. To find out about the laws specific to your city or county use LawHelp/NY ( to find a housing legal services provider in your area.

Admissions- Getting into housing with a criminal record

Public housing agencies and Section 8 providers can and do obtain criminal records of applicants and tenants. Much of the information in this section is based on How to Get Section 8 or Public Housing Even With a Criminal Record, a publication of the Legal Action Center.

– See more at:


Hat Tip to:

Jimmy Lathrop 


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Best Practices for Claimants’ Representatives, SSA, ODAR

Best Practices For Claimants’ Representatives

SSA Publication No. 70-061, January 2011

Frank A. Cristaudo

Associate Chief Administrative Law Judge

Social Security Administration

Office of Disability Adjudication and Review

We are pleased to publish the newly reformatted Best Practices Handbook for claimants’ representatives. It is our hope that all claimants’ representatives will use this handbook as a practice aid when advocating and appearing before the Office of Disability Adjudication and Review.

The Office of Disability Adjudication and Review is one of the largest administrative adjudicatory systems in the world. The claimants who appear before us may feel overwhelmed by the legal and administrative requirements associated with pursuing a Social Security claim. Therefore, it is important for those most closely associated with this effort to work together in a collegial and professional manner to make this process as efficient as possible. It is to this end that we publish this handbook so that we can successfully fulfill our joint mission to provide the best possible service to the public.

Read More…

Download Handbook:


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IRS Repeats Warning about Phone Scams

The Internal Revenue Service and the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration continue to hear from taxpayers who have received unsolicited calls from individuals demanding payment while fraudulently claiming to represent the IRS.

“There are clear warning signs about these scams, which continue at high levels throughout the nation,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “Taxpayers should remember their first contact with the IRS will not be a call from out of the blue, but through official correspondence sent through the mail. A big red flag for these scams are angry, threatening calls from people who say they are from the IRS and urging immediate payment. This is not how we operate. People should hang up immediately and contact TIGTA or the IRS.”

Additionally, it is important for taxpayers to know that the IRS:

  • Never asks for credit card, debit card or prepaid card information over the telephone.
  • Never insists that taxpayers use a specific payment method to pay tax obligations
  • Never requests immediate payment over the telephone and will not take enforcement action immediately following a phone conversation. Taxpayers usually receive prior notification of IRS enforcement action involving IRS tax liens or levies.

Read entire article here.

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