Something New: My Shared Reading Room – Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Tips Blog

Jim Calloway:

I read a lot of online content related to law office management and technology. Some I save for later use and some I share. I follow some really great experts on Twitter who recommend great content and I retweet a lot of it. (Of course you should be following me on Twitter.)

At least once a month, I discard an idea that
was suggested to me by something I read that could have inspired a good blog post or article. I just don’t have unlimited time.

So it occurred to me that I could easily share some of the most interesting things I have read with others. So that is the point of the OBA MAP Reading Room. Every month, I’ll provide links without commentary to several articles I found of interest the previous month. That doesn’t mean they were published that month. it just signifies when I found them.

So here is the MAP Reading Room for August 2015. This is still a concept in progress, but hopefully it will be useful to  you.

The main index for the Reading Room is here, available for you to bookmark if you wish. We have links for each of the prior months this year. (And, yes, I am working on September now.) We hope this type of curated content makes sense for you. The collection will be a bit random and may include some of my own content.

Read entire Calloway article.

For Sole Practitioners, the Future’s Not What It Used to Be

For Sole Practitioners, the Future’s Not What It Used to Be

by Stephen P. Gallagher and Leonard E. Sienko, Jr. 

(NYSBA Journal, Oct. 2015)

The nitty-gritty – and the joys – of a solo practice in the new (and changing) world order. Search the world’s historic newspaper archives


An interesting complement to the comprehensive newspaper collections held by many libraries, Elephind is something of a boutique collection. The digital newspaper collections search engine contains 2,705 fully digitized newspaper titles, provided by about 21 library partners, that range from the Door County Library (Wisconsin) with one title, to the US Library of Congress with 1,060 titles and The National Library of Australia somewhere in between, at 681. With that range, Elephind is not going to answer all questions, but should be able to provide a wealth of information for some inquiries. For example, I found nothing on my paternal grandfather, whose obituary appeared in the New York Times in 1952. Observing that the Digital Daily Kent Stater Archive is part of Elephind, I tried a search for “kent state shooting 1971” and retrieved 33 results, but it was difficult to eliminate false drops such as “kent” in a personal name. For effective use of this search engine, check the list of newspaper titles carefully – if a user is seeking information on a topic that was covered in one of the titles in Elephind, good results should be retrieved. Otherwise, it is a something of a needle in a haystack search. [DS]

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2015.

WARNING From The Editor:  You can waste a lot of time looking up mentions of yourself in your college newspaper from 50 years ago

That TSA-approved lock on your suitcase just got hacked | Computerworld

It’s a basic fact of life that once you publish something on the Internet, it’s pretty much impossible to get it back. Now illustrating that point with painful clarity, images of the TSA‘s master luggage keys have been published online, meaning that anyone with a 3D printer can make their own.

More detail from Computerworld here.

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Debt by Degrees — ProPublica’s College Scorecard

Debt by Degrees

Which Colleges Help Poor Students Most?

by Sisi Wei and Annie Waldman, ProPublica, Sept. 12, 2015

New data from the U.S. Department of Education shows in unprecedented detail how much federal student loan debt college students from low-income families are being saddled with. Use this interactive database to search among 6,000 schools in the U.S. to see how much they support their poorest students financially. Related: Colleges Flush With Cash Saddle Poorest Students With Debt »

Read entire article…use search tool.

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The Mindset List: 2019 List

Beloit College Releases the Mindset List for This Year’s Entering Class of First-Year College Students, The Class of 2019


Beloit, Wis. —  Members of the entering college class of 2019 were mostly born in 1997 and have never licked a postage stamp, have assumed that  Wi-Fi is an entitlement, and have no first-hand experience of Princess Diana’s charismatic celebrity.

Each August since 1998, Beloit College has released the Beloit College Mindset List, providing a look at the cultural touchstones that shape the lives of students entering college this fall. For this year’s entering class there has always been Google; Email, informal to previous Millennials, has emerged as “the new formal” for them, while texting and other social media serve as the wild and wooly mode of exchange. Teachers have had to work overtime encouraging them to move beyond the Web and consult sources in books and journals. And Poland has always been a member of NATO, suggesting that Mr. Putin’s heartburn about Western expansion is at least as old as the new college kids are.

“The Class of 2019 will enter college with high technology an increasing factor in how and even what they learn,” said Charles Westerberg, Director of the Liberal Arts in Practice Center and Brannon-Ballard Professor of Sociology at Beloit College. “They will encounter difficult discussions about privilege, race, and sexual assault on campus. They may think of the ‘last century’ as the twentieth, not the nineteenth, so they will need ever wider perspectives about the burgeoning mass of information that will be heading their way. And they will need a keen ability to decipher what is the same and what has changed with respect to many of these issues.”

In fairness to the members of the entering class, this year’s Mindset List also includes an addendum of terms that faculty need to understand if they are going to communicate effectively.

The Beloit College Mindset List, which this year is as old as the entering students themselves, is created by Ron Nief, Emeritus Director of Public Affairs; Tom McBride, Emeritus Professor of English; and Charles Westerberg. Additional items on the list as well as commentaries and guides are found at and www.themindsetlist.comRegular updates and discussions are on Facebook and Twitter.

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JURIST – Federal judge orders release of immigrant children from detention centers


[JURIST] Judge Dolly Gee of the US District Court for the Central District of California [official website] on Friday upheld [order, PDF] her July decision [JURIST report] and ordered the government to release immigrant children held in family detention centers, “without necessary delay.” The original ruling [opinion, PDF] found that the current Department of Justice (DOJ) [official website] method of detaining children with their mothers violates a 1997 court settlement. The settlement bars children from being detained in unlicensed secure facilities. 


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