Solo/Small Firm Solution Room–GP Section–FREE Program for Section Members

GP Section members in the Capital Region:

 

The NYSBA General Practice Section is hosting a program for solo and small firm attorneys as follows:

 

Date:    Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Time:    5:30-7:30pm – Registration and light dinner at 5pm

Place:   New York State Bar Center | 1 Elk Street, Albany, NY

 

The event is free to General Practice Section members ($0 GP Section members / $15 NYSBA members / $30 non-members), but pre-registration is required.

 

The concept is simple: Lawyers talking to lawyers, about the real issues of solo and small firm practice. A facilitated format (The Solution Room) keeps discussion focused and lively, while attendees with a range of experience levels have opportunity to both give and receive advice on professional challenges. The Solution Room format has been used successfully in a range of professions on multiple continents to engage professionals in productive peer-to-peer discussion. The program will be facilitated by Adrian Segar of Conferences That Work in Marlboro, VT. For more details, see www.nysba.org/SoloSR18.

 

To register:

Register online at www.nysba.org/SoloSR18

 

Or GP Section members may RSVP via email to generalpractice@nysba.org. Please indicate your approximate length of time in solo/small firm practice, whether (a) 6 months-5 years (b) 6-10 years (c) 11-15 years, (d) 16-20 years, or (e) 20 years+.

 

And tell a friend!

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Trump Has Quietly Cut Legal Aid for Migrant Kids Separated from Parents – VICE

Meredith Hoffman
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When the Trump administration announced this month it would criminally prosecute everyone who crossed the border illegally, which meant jailing immigrant parents and separating them from their children, it effectively manufactured a whole new group of unaccompanied minors who now must navigate the complicated US immigration system by themselves. In less than two weeks, 658 kids were divided from their mothers and fathers–and the policy is still ramping up.

Meanwhile, the government has just quietly shut off a legal lifeline for this very population, putting them at an even higher risk of deportation. The Office of Refugee Resettlement, a federal program that for over a decade has funded organizations representing unaccompanied minors in immigration court while those children live with adult relatives or guardians, told the groups to stop taking new cases just days after the family separation policy began, multiple sources from nonprofit groups funded by ORR told me.

“The government is creating unaccompanied kids, then releasing them to someone other than parents, and then further restricting their ability to access counsel,” said Manoj Govindaiah, director of family detention services for Texas’s Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES), which has represented kids through the ORR funds. “So they’re almost ensuring people cannot successfully navigate the immigration court process.”

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Read more…

Why Today’s Seasoned Lawyers Shouldn’t Mentor Newbies | Above the Law

It’s possible you’re not as wise as you think you are.

Earlier this month, ATL Columnist Jill Switzer took seasoned lawyers to task for their failure to mentor the next generation. But Switzer’s criticism presupposes that an experienced lawyers’ mentorship carries great value. Spoiler alert: it doesn’t. Over the past decade, technologic, economic and social forces have so transformed the legal profession that the worldview and wisdom of Boomer and GenX lawyers hold little relevance.

Lawyers weigh in: Why is there a depression epidemic in the profession?–ABA Journal

BY DINA ROTH PORT

Through my job as director of content at Rocket Matter, I’ve learned a lot about this profession. One thing that has really stood out to me is how many lawyers are suffering.

Our website recently ran a five-part series on depression, substance abuse and wellness in the legal industry. The statistics are staggering: Lawyers are 3.6 times as likely to be depressed as people in other jobs, while the landmark 2016 American Bar Association and Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation study found that 28 percent of licensed, employed lawyers suffer with depression. The study also showed that 19 percent have symptoms of anxiety and 21 percent are problem drinkers.

Many organizations are trying to help fight this epidemic. For instance, we’re hosting our first Legal Wellness Retreat in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts on July 18 to July 20. Also, the ABA provides a very comprehensive list of helpful resources for lawyersjudges and law students, along with links to lawyer assistance programsthroughout the country.

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Statement on NY Court of Appeals Decision in Chimpanzee Rights Cases–Nonhuman Rights Project

Chimpanzee. Taken at the Los Angeles Zoo.

Chimpanzee. Taken at the Los Angeles Zoo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

May 8, 2018–New York, NY–Today, Eugene M. Fahey–an Associate Judge on New York’s highest court, the Court of Appeals–issued an opinion that is already being seen as an historic mark of progress in the fight to secure fundamental legal rights for nonhuman animals.

Without giving a ground for its action, the Court of Appeals as a whole again refused to hear our motion for further review of a lower court decision on behalf of chimpanzees Tommy and Kiko. This in itself is not significant insofar as the Court of Appeals rejects the vast majority of motions it receives for permission to appeal.

But Judge Fahey’s concurring opinion makes clear that the decision not to hear Tommy and Kiko’s cases was not made on the merits of the NhRP’s claim.

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Here are three remarkable excerpts from the opinion:

“In elevating our species, we should not lower the status of other highly intelligent species.”

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“To treat a chimpanzee as if he or she had no right to liberty protected by habeas corpus is to regard the chimpanzee as entirely lacking independent worth, as a mere resource for human use, a thing the value of which consists exclusively in its usefulness to others. Instead, we should consider whether a chimpanzee is an individual with inherent value who has the right to be treated with respect.”

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“In the interval since we first denied leave to the Nonhuman Rights Project, I have struggled with whether this was the right decision. Although I concur in the Court’s decision to deny leave to appeal now, I continue to question whether the Court was right to deny leave in the first instance. The issue whether a nonhuman animal has a fundamental right to liberty protected by the writ of habeas corpus is profound and far-reaching. It speaks to our relationship with all the life around us. Ultimately, we will not be able to ignore it. While it may be arguable that a chimpanzee is not a ‘person,’ there is no doubt that it is not merely a thing.”

***

Read more…

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Sharply Divided Court of Appeals Removes Hurdle for Tort Plaintiffs to Gain Summary Judgment | New York Law Journal

By Andrew Denney

Ruling on an issue that has divided New York judges and “perplexed courts for some time,” a split Court of Appeals ruled that plaintiffs in comparative negligence cases need not bear the “double burden” of disproving their own negligence to win on summary judgment.

The high court’s 4-3 ruling clears up an issue that has bedeviled New York courts for decades, which has resulting in inconsistent case law on the issue of whether plaintiffs have to show that they are free of negligence to succeed on a summary judgment motion when determining a defendant’s liability.

Writing for the majority, Judge Paul Feinman said placing the burden on the plaintiff, a New York City sanitation worker injured on the job who sued the city government, to show an absence of fault is inconsistent with a state statute, which since 1975 has directed courts to assess a plaintiff’s comparative negligence only at the damages stage.

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A guide to car subscriptions, the alternative to buying and leasing–CNET/Roadshow

BY 

It’s 2018. We have drones and hoverboards, our phones unlock by scanning our faces and anything in the world can be delivered to your door with a couple of clicks. Why should we be stuck with buying or leasing as our only means of procuring a car to drive?

Thankfully, vehicle subscription services are becoming more and more popular. Think of it like any other subscription: Sign up for what you want, cancel it when you’re done. From automakers to third-party companies, there are many ways to subscribe to your next new car.

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