A New Phone Comes Out. Yours Slows Down. A Conspiracy? No. – The New York Times

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The phenomenon of perceived slowdowns is so widespread that many believe tech companies intentionally cripple smartphones and computers to ensure that people buy new ones every few years. Conspiracy theorists call it planned obsolescence.

That’s a myth. While slowdowns happen, they take place for a far less nefarious reason. That reason is a software upgrade.

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Stay Up To Date With These Legal Technology Blogs | Above the Law

Subscribe to some of these blogs and you’ll be well on your way to meeting your ethical obligation to stay abreast of changes in legal technology.

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The majority of jurisdictions (28) now require lawyers to stay on top of legal technology changes. This means that the majority of lawyers have an ethical obligation to learn about and understand technology in order to make informed decisions about whether to use technology in their practices.

Of course, the challenge for most lawyers is figuring out how to find the time to learn about technology, given the ever-present demands of practicing law and running busy law practices. Aside from attending on-point CLEs, one of the easiest ways to learn about legal technology is to use an RSS feed reader such as feedly (my feed reader of choice), subscribe to number of legal technology blogs, and spend a few minutes each day reading them and learning about the latest legal technology trends.

There are a lot of blogs out there, however, so knowing which ones to subscribe to isn’t always easy. To get you started, here are some of my favorite legal technology blogs. I read posts from these bloggers each and every day and find their insight and advice to be invaluable.

House GOP Tax Bill Would End Electric-Car Tax Credits – Bloomberg

The push by Tesla Inc.General Motors Co. and other carmakers to boost sales of electric vehicles was dealt a blow by House Republicans who on Thursday proposed eliminating a $7,500 per vehicle tax credit that has helped stoke early demand.

“That will stop any electric vehicle market in the U.S., apart from sales of the highly expensive Tesla Model S,” said Xavier Mosquet, senior partner at consultant Boston Consulting Group, who authored a study on the growth of battery powered vehicles. “There’s no Tesla 3, no Bolt, no Leaf in a market without incentives.”

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Possibilities and Frustrations of the ‘On-Demand’ Attorney | Law.com

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández | October 27, 2017 | Originally published on Legaltech News

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Four years ago, Richard Susskind published the first edition of “Tomorrow’s Lawyers: An Introduction to Your Future.” With the rapid changes in the legal profession, tomorrow is now today.

The second edition of “Tomorrow’s Lawyers” focuses more sharply on how artificial intelligence, alternative business structures, low-cost law firm service centers, legal tech startups and evolving in-house roles are changing the way legal services are delivered and how law schools are educating students to meet those changes.

To that end, ALM during October is publishing excerpts across several of our brands from the second edition to spark thought and conversation about the industry’s future among the legal profession’s leaders. ALM editors and reporters have solicited reactions–positive and negative–to Susskind’s ideas from law firm chairs, top legal educators, general counsel, law students and industry analysts to get their take. 

The book’s section on automation and connectivity, discussed below, can be found here.

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How Google’s Physical Keys Will Protect Your Password – The New York Times

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Anyone with a Google account can sign up for the security program on Google’s Advanced Protection webpage. To get started, you will have to buy two physical keys for about $20 each. Google recommends buying one from Feitian and another from Yubico.

The keys, which look like thumb drives and can fit on your key chain, contain digital signatures that prove you are you. To set one up, you plug the key into a computer USB port, tap a button and name it. (The Feitian key wirelessly communicates with your smartphone to authenticate the login.) This process takes a few minutes.

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What is the technology needed for access to justice?–ABA Journal

By Mary E. Juetten, CA, CPA, JD, founder and CEO of Traklight. In 2015, Mary co-founded Evolve Law, an organization for change and technology adoption in the law. She was named to the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center 2016 Women in Legal Tech list and the Fastcase 50 Class of 2016. She is the author of Small Law Firm KPIs: How to Measure Your Way to Greater Profits. She is always looking or success stories where technology has been used to bridge the justice gap, from pro-bono through low-bono to non-traditional legal services delivery. Reach out to her on Twitter @maryjuetten.
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Therefore, clients are demanding mobile applications that provide direct access to a firm. In addition, consumers want education; online questionnaires to gather information rather than in-person consultations; and free legal forms for specific practice areas. Rather than fighting this trend toward creating mobile legal products and services, attorneys can use online information-gathering tools to triage and educate clients and focus on professional judgment for problem-solving.

Firms have made standard forms free, for example Orrick’s Start Forms Library. Also, legal plans have free forms on mobile applications, like LegalShield’s Forms app, which includes more than 15 free forms for common consumer transactions like renting, buying and selling–plus freelance agreements. Taking it a step further, we need to use mainstream technology to create solutions for specific applications within the law. For example, we can utilize chabots to answer frequently asked questions or customizable expert systems for immigration or incorporation questionnaires.

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Check out Orrick’s Start Forms Library

New N.S.A. Breach Linked to Popular Russian Antivirus Software – The New York Times

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Investigators believe the hackers may have penetrated the computer by exploiting Kaspersky Lab antivirus software, a Russian brand widely used around the world, that the employee was using, according to officials briefed on the matter.
 
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The officials did not make their concerns public, and the antivirus software remains popular. But last month the federal government ordered the Kaspersky software removed from all government computers. The F.B.I. has been investigating whether Kaspersky products, especially the well-reviewed antivirus programs, contain “back doors” that could allow Russian intelligence agencies into any computers or networks on which they are running. The company has always denied that it has any links to Russian intelligence.

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