What is the technology needed for access to justice?–ABA Journal

By Mary E. Juetten, CA, CPA, JD, founder and CEO of Traklight. In 2015, Mary co-founded Evolve Law, an organization for change and technology adoption in the law. She was named to the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center 2016 Women in Legal Tech list and the Fastcase 50 Class of 2016. She is the author of Small Law Firm KPIs: How to Measure Your Way to Greater Profits. She is always looking or success stories where technology has been used to bridge the justice gap, from pro-bono through low-bono to non-traditional legal services delivery. Reach out to her on Twitter @maryjuetten.
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Therefore, clients are demanding mobile applications that provide direct access to a firm. In addition, consumers want education; online questionnaires to gather information rather than in-person consultations; and free legal forms for specific practice areas. Rather than fighting this trend toward creating mobile legal products and services, attorneys can use online information-gathering tools to triage and educate clients and focus on professional judgment for problem-solving.

Firms have made standard forms free, for example Orrick’s Start Forms Library. Also, legal plans have free forms on mobile applications, like LegalShield’s Forms app, which includes more than 15 free forms for common consumer transactions like renting, buying and selling–plus freelance agreements. Taking it a step further, we need to use mainstream technology to create solutions for specific applications within the law. For example, we can utilize chabots to answer frequently asked questions or customizable expert systems for immigration or incorporation questionnaires.

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Check out Orrick’s Start Forms Library

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New N.S.A. Breach Linked to Popular Russian Antivirus Software – The New York Times

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Investigators believe the hackers may have penetrated the computer by exploiting Kaspersky Lab antivirus software, a Russian brand widely used around the world, that the employee was using, according to officials briefed on the matter.
 
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The officials did not make their concerns public, and the antivirus software remains popular. But last month the federal government ordered the Kaspersky software removed from all government computers. The F.B.I. has been investigating whether Kaspersky products, especially the well-reviewed antivirus programs, contain “back doors” that could allow Russian intelligence agencies into any computers or networks on which they are running. The company has always denied that it has any links to Russian intelligence.

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Law firm’s automatic deletion of spam emails is blamed for failure to file timely appeal–ABA Journal

A Florida law firm’s failure to appeal an order assessing attorney fees doesn’t constitute excusable neglect when its email system apparently perceived the order to be spam and erased it, a Florida appeals court has ruled.
The Aug. 10 decision by Florida’s First District Court of Appeal is being touted as a cautionary tale for lawyers, Law.com (sub. req.) reports.

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iTunes Removes the App Store and More to Focus on Music, Movies, TV Shows, Podcasts, and Audiobooks – MacStories

Apple has updated iTunes on macOS to eliminate ringtones, iTunes U, and perhaps most surprising of all, iOS apps. According to Apple’s support page:
Apps for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch are now exclusively available in the new App Store for iOS.

Traveling out of the country? Lawyers should consider using ‘burner’ devices

BY DEBRA CASSENS WEISS

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Lawyers should take precautions if they want to bring electronic devices with them, according to a program hosted Friday at the ABA Annual Meeting in New York City called “Prying Eyes: Think Confidential and Privileged Client Information Is Safe at the Border? Guess Again.”
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Hinshaw & Culbertson partner Steven Puiszis, the firm’s general counsel for privacy, security and compliance, described the precautions taken by lawyers at many large law firms. They typically require lawyers to take “burner” laptops and phones with them that don’t contain client data. Lawyers can connect to the firm’s network through a virtual private network.
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Top 5 FAQs on Smart Contracts and Legal AI Services – Technologist

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Legal software keeps getting better and better. While the fear of being replaced by an artificially intelligent robot looms more closely for some lawyers than others, for the rest of us, the technological advances just make practicing law even better, and easier.

If you’ve been thinking about using smart contracts, or some other type of legal AI software or service, you probably have a few questions. Below you’ll find five of the top frequently asked questions on smart contracts and legal AI software.

Read more….be certain to “click” on the topic headings for much more detail…

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Technical Difficulties: What to Do When Gadgets Fail in Court – Technologist

There’s no question to it, using technological gadgets during a trial, or even just a hearing or scheduling conference, has made the lawyer’s life increasingly easier. Using laptops, smartphones, tablets, digital projectors, and other devices can make a big difference, not just in saving time, but also in keeping organized and making presentations to the court. Electronics, which were once banned, are now becoming commonplace.

But what do you do if a device fails? Or worse, fails mid-presentation? Below, you’ll find some tips on what to do, and what not to do.

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