Budget deal restores tax credits for EV charging stations, electric motorcycles, fuel-cell cars–Green Car Reports

Fears that Congress would kill the federal tax credit for purchase of a plug-in electric car were laid to rest in December when that incentive survived the $1.5 billion tax-cut bill.

Now Congress has added back a handful of other tax credits related to electric cars and greener transportation in the $400 billion budget bill it passed in the wee hours of Friday morning, quickly signed by the president.

The 652-page Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (HR 1892) restores a tax credit for installation of alternative-vehicle fueling property that had expired at the end of 2016.

***

Taxpayers who purchased or installed a home charging station for electric cars during 2017 will find the forms and rules for individual returns here.

Read More…

Related articles

Advertisements

In Policy Shift, Lawyers Allowed to Use Electronic Devices During Arguments in 1st Dept. Courthouse | New York Law Journal

t’s a sign of the times. Starting next week, electronic devices will be permitted in New York’s 19th century Madison Avenue courtrooms during proceedings. It marks the first time that any of the departments of the Appellate Division have adopted a written policy allowing lawyers and litigants arguing pro se to use laptops, tablets and smartphones during oral arguments.

Thinking Smartly About Smart Contracts-Dennis Kennedy

My first published article of 2018 has appeared in Law Practice magazine and it’s called “Thinking Smartly About Smart Contracts.”

The editors of the magazine approached me a while back to see if I wanted to write a blockchain article that would introduce lawyers and others to the blockchain concept and its implications. I told them that I felt that the article Gwynne Monahan and I wrote last year (“Lawyers Get Ready, There’s a Blockchain Coming“) was still a good starting point. However, I said, I was willing to write an article that was a primer about “smart contracting,” which is a next big step in blockchain evolution. They liked the idea and the result is this article.

Read more…

Related articles

Artificial Lawyer Interview: Jake Heller, CEO, Casetext – Artificial Lawyer

***

Artificial Lawyer recently caught up with Jake Heller, the co-founder and CEO of Casetext, ahead of the legal AI company’s launch of two new features for its litigation analysis platform.

So, first, let’s hear about the two new aspects of the natural language processing-driven platform that is seeking to change the way lawyers approach legal research.

The new capability Black Letter Law enables users to quickly identify axiomatic statements of law, which is particularly useful for lawyers researching outside of their core practice areas, ‘as well as for litigators hunting for foundational case law to support a brief or oral argument’.

Meanwhile the new Holdings feature is the largest searchable collection of concise case summaries ever assembled, the company says. To create Holdings, Casetext applied a tactic they call ‘judicial language processing’, exploiting patterns within the US case law corpus to excerpt summaries directly from judicial opinions. This allows ‘any lawyer looking to quickly familiarise herself with the crux of a judicial opinion and nimbly compare and contrast similar holdings across a particular area of law’ says Casetext.

Read more…

A New Phone Comes Out. Yours Slows Down. A Conspiracy? No. – The New York Times

***

The phenomenon of perceived slowdowns is so widespread that many believe tech companies intentionally cripple smartphones and computers to ensure that people buy new ones every few years. Conspiracy theorists call it planned obsolescence.

That’s a myth. While slowdowns happen, they take place for a far less nefarious reason. That reason is a software upgrade.

***

Read more…

Related articles

Stay Up To Date With These Legal Technology Blogs | Above the Law

Subscribe to some of these blogs and you’ll be well on your way to meeting your ethical obligation to stay abreast of changes in legal technology.

***

The majority of jurisdictions (28) now require lawyers to stay on top of legal technology changes. This means that the majority of lawyers have an ethical obligation to learn about and understand technology in order to make informed decisions about whether to use technology in their practices.

Of course, the challenge for most lawyers is figuring out how to find the time to learn about technology, given the ever-present demands of practicing law and running busy law practices. Aside from attending on-point CLEs, one of the easiest ways to learn about legal technology is to use an RSS feed reader such as feedly (my feed reader of choice), subscribe to number of legal technology blogs, and spend a few minutes each day reading them and learning about the latest legal technology trends.

There are a lot of blogs out there, however, so knowing which ones to subscribe to isn’t always easy. To get you started, here are some of my favorite legal technology blogs. I read posts from these bloggers each and every day and find their insight and advice to be invaluable.

House GOP Tax Bill Would End Electric-Car Tax Credits – Bloomberg

The push by Tesla Inc.General Motors Co. and other carmakers to boost sales of electric vehicles was dealt a blow by House Republicans who on Thursday proposed eliminating a $7,500 per vehicle tax credit that has helped stoke early demand.

“That will stop any electric vehicle market in the U.S., apart from sales of the highly expensive Tesla Model S,” said Xavier Mosquet, senior partner at consultant Boston Consulting Group, who authored a study on the growth of battery powered vehicles. “There’s no Tesla 3, no Bolt, no Leaf in a market without incentives.”

Related articles