Law Office Voice Mail Tips: 5 Best Practices – Strategist

By Mark Wilson, Esq. on February 2, 2015 8:50 AM

Even in Web 2.0 world, the telephone — and its constant companion, voice mail — are still with us. There are actually a lot of people out there who prefer the scintilla of human interaction the phone provides over the cold, lifeless specter of email. (Or the tantalizing fun of Snapchat.)

As with every office practice, voice mail has its own etiquette and best practices guide. Here some of the rules you should keep in mind for professional and efficient voice mail communications.

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The value of the iPhone 6 Plus for lawyers-Kevin O’Keefe

By Kevin O’Keefe on January 6, 2015 in Mobile, Publishing

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We’re all in the media today. You as a lawyer or legal marketing professional and me as the CEO of a company. We report and comment directly to our audience or we’ll not be heard. The days where reporters contacted us, though not completely over, are on the steep decline. The impact of public relations professionals getting us media coverage is also on the decline.

In addition to the change in who is a media producer, how the media moves has changed. An awful lot of media is distributed socially, from person to person, via blogs and social networks. Brand name media companies do not have near the distribution power. In fact they rely on everyday people like you and I to move their stories via social media.

If I can produce media and share media, I’m part of the media. If I do that on a niche, like good lawyers do, I get known, build relationships and build word of mouth. I’ll even get better at what I do by learning via my social network.

How does Plus help with this?

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Read more…

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Chromebook Buying Guide – Amazon.com

You’ve compared all your laptop options and are considering a Chromebook.  But now comes the hard part–choosing just the right model. Amazon is here to help. Click here to see a side by side comparison. If you’d like some more information, read on or visit their Chromebook Store.

Chromebooks are a unique class of mobile computing devices, designed specifically for Web-based tasks. They differ from traditional laptops in a few important ways: 

Chromebooks run Web-based apps, not traditional PC applications. 

Chromebooks are designed to be connected to the Internet. You can create documents and spreadsheets or edit photos on a Chromebook using Google apps designed for these purposes. The Chrome operating system will not load and run traditional PC software like Microsoft Office and Adobe Photoshop. However, files created in these applications can be viewed and edited using Google apps on your Chromebook or cloud-based applications like Microsoft’s Office web apps.

You store your files in the Cloud, not on the machine.  

To help make them thin and light, Chromebooks are built without large-capacity drives. So instead of storing your documents, videos, and photos on your computer, you save them to Google Drive (Google’s Cloud-based storage service). Your files are password-protected and secure, and you can access them anywhere there’s an Internet connection. If you know you’ll want access to a file or photo offline, however, you can easily save it to the built-in solid-state drive.

Read more Chromebook Buying Guide-click here.

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Supreme Court to develop electronic filing system as soon as 2016-JURIST

[JURIST] US Supreme Court [official website] Chief Justice John Roberts announced in the 2014 Year-End Report [report, PDF] Wednesday that the Supreme Court is developing an electronic filing system, expected to be operational in 2016. This will make documents available online to the public with no charge, including petitions, responses to petitions, merits briefs, motions and applications. In the report, Roberts explained that courts are usually more guarded in developing cutting-edge innovation…

Read more here.

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Office Lens Update Brings Ability To Create Office Documents From Pictures

Microsoft describes the Office Lens app for Windows Phone akin to having a scanner in your pocket. Users simply need to take a photo through the application to digitalize notes on blackboards or whiteboards. It also makes it easier to easily store important documents and business cards in digital format. Today the Office Lens app has been updated with a new functionality that will allow users to create Office documents out of the pictures that they snap.

Read more.

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Apple Watch Update: More Details and Hands-On Impressions-David Pogue

David Pogue had the opportunity to try the AppleWatch and provides some of his impressions :

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DVD release of the 1961 cartoon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What you also couldn’t tell in the keynote presentation was how this watch feels and sounds. It issues little vibrations of various intensities (it can control both the intensity and the rapidity of the vibration), which will have different meanings. For example, one vibration means “turn left” when you’re using GPS, and another means “turn right.” The watch is light and comfortable, and its sounds are clear and full of personality.

There’s a speaker and a microphone on the watch. You can, in fact, take and make phone calls from your wrist, Dick Tracy style. That goofy ergonomic position was first made laughable by the Samsung Gear watches, so I’m not sure how many people will use it — but you can do it if you want.

Read Pogue’s entire review here.

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Today’s Tech: A Federal Judge And His iPad (Part 2) « Above the Law: A Legal Web Site

 

By NICOLE BLACK

In my last column, I shared how Judge Richard Wesley of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is using his iPad while on the bench. I explained how he got started using technology–by using PDFs instead of paper documents–and eventually transitioned to using his iPad for many of his judicial duties. And we learned that not only does he use an iPad, he has managed to convince some of his Second Circuit colleagues to do the same, thus reducing the amount of paper used by the judges.

It was clear from my last column that Judge Wesley is sold on the benefits of using technology. But he’s also well aware of the drawbacks–a topic I promised to cover in today’s column. So let’s get started.

Read More

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