MAC USER: The Apple Watch | Solo, Small Firm and General Practice Divisio

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Victoria L. Herring (vlh@herringlaw.com) practices in Des Moines, Iowa, in an office that has used only Apple/Macs since the early 1980s.

I’m just old enough to remember the comic strip Dick Tracy and its image of the detective talking into his wristwatch, a two-way radio. The Apple Watch can be seen as something similar, but it’s more than that. Plus, it’s a bit weird to be talking into your wrist, even if there’s an Apple Watch on it, so that is not something you’ll do all that often.

I did not buy my Apple Watch immediately. I decided to wait and see the early reviews. Besides, I am not in the habit of wearing a watch and normally just look around for a clock or pull out my iPhone to check the time. However, after a few weeks I decided to go ahead and buy an Apple Watch, hoping it would be a good investment. Of course, I didn’t buy the top-of-the-line model, not having an extra $17,000 for the gold Apple Watch Edition. Instead, I opted for the $349 Apple Watch Sport with a black sport band and a 38 mm space gray aluminum case. I now have some views on how the Apple Watch has already or will in the future impact my life.

Read the entire review here.

National Information Center

The National Information Center (NIC) is a central repository of data about banks and other institutions for which the Federal Reserve has a supervisory, regulatory, or research interest, including both domestic and foreign banking organizations operating in the United States. This web site provides access to NIC data, allowing the public to search for detailed information about banking organizations. 

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National Information Center

ABA Law Student Podcast by Legal Talk Network on iTunes

Presented by the American Bar Association‘s Law Student Division, the ABA Law Student Podcast covers issues that affect law students, law schools, and recent grads. From finals and graduation to the bar exam and finding a job, this show is your trusted resource for the next big step.

Download here.

New York launches probe into speeds at big Internet broadband providers | Reuters

BY SARAH N. LYNCH

New York state’s attorney general is probing whether three major Internet providers could be shortchanging consumers by charging them for faster broadband speeds and failing to deliver the speeds being advertised, according to documents seen by Reuters.

The letters, sent on Friday to executives at Verizon Communications Inc (VZ.N), Cablevision Systems Corp (CVC.N) and Time Warner Cable Inc (TWC.N), ask each company to provide copies of all disclosures they have made to customers, as well as copies of any testing they may have done of their Internet speeds. 

“New Yorkers deserve the Internet speeds they pay for. But, it turns out, many of us may be paying for one thing, and getting another,” Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a statement.

Read entire article.

Which Apple TV Should You Buy? | WIRED

PRE-ORDERS FOR THE new Apple TV have begun. Well, technically, the new Apple TVs; the latest model comes in two sizes. Oh, and the previous version remains available too. For the first time in Apple TV history, you’ve got options. Now it’s time to figure out which one’s right for you.

WIRED  wants to help you choose.

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New York Leads the Way on Transgender Rights – The New York Times-Editorial

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday announced an executive action establishing the first-ever

 statewide regulations protecting transgender New Yorkers from discrimination.

The regulations extend the provisions of a 1945 state human rights law to prohibit 

discrimination on the basis of gender identity in housing, employment and public accommodations 

like restaurants, hospitals and schools. They also protect transgender people from discrimination 

when seeking mortgages, credit cards and other financial services. Transgender people who

 have experienced discrimination can file a complaint in court, with the attorney general or 

with the State Division of Human Rights. If the division finds that discrimination has occurred, 

it can award compensatory damages, require policy changes, and levy fines and penalties of up to $100,000.

Read more.

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Camerawoman Who Was Fired For Kicking Migrants To Sue Facebook : The Two-Way : NPR

The camerawoman who drew international ire after viral videos of her kicking and tripping migrants crossing into Hungary from Serbia last month, says she plans to sue Facebook and one of the refugees she kicked.

Petra Laszlo, formerly of Hungarian Internet-based channel N1TV, told a Russian newspaper of her plans to sue Facebook for allegedly failing to take down threatening and negative pages on the social media site, according to an online translation of the Izvestia report.

Read complete NPR report here.

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