A New Era of Internet Attacks Powered by Everyday Devices – The New York Times


Continue reading the main story


The attack on the infrastructure of the internet, which made it all but impossible at times to check Twitter feeds or headlines, was a remarkable reminder about how billions of ordinary web-connected devices — many of them highly insecure — can be turned to vicious purposes. And the threats will continue long after Election Day for a nation that increasingly keeps its data in the cloud and has oftentimes kept its head in the sand.


But hundreds of thousands, and maybe millions, of those security cameras and other devices have been infected with a fairly simple program that guessed at their factory-set passwords — often “admin” or “12345” or even, yes, “password” — and, once inside, turned them into an army of simple robots. Each one was commanded, at a coordinated time, to bombard a small company in Manchester, N.H., called Dyn DNS with messages that overloaded its circuits.


Read entire article here…

Related articles

Vermont Wind Project Needs Support, So Company Offers to Pay Voters – The New York Times


Opponents were outraged at the payments, perceiving them as an attempt to buy votes, and complained to state officials.

But Michael O. Duane, senior assistant attorney general, said the payments did not violate state law. The proposal “doesn’t say that the funds go only to those people who signed a sworn statement that they had voted for it,” he said.

Still, the payment proposal has left a sour taste. As The Rutland Herald put it in an editorial on Sunday, “The naked offer of money to individual citizens may be even more corrosive to the civic life of the town than the potential environmental effects of the wind turbines.”


Read entire report…

Related articles

Sexual Minorities Uganda v. Scott Lively | Center for Constitutional Rights

SMUG v. Lively is a federal lawsuit in which CCR represents Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG), a non-profit LGBTI advocacy organization in Uganda. SMUG is suing Scott Lively, a U.S.-based anti-gay extremist, for his role in the persecution of LGBTI people in Uganda, in particular his active participation in the conspiracy to strip away their fundamental rights. The case is part of CCR’s cutting edge international human rights work and groundbreaking efforts to protect and expand rights under the area of law related to the Alien Tort Statute (ATS) and continues CCR’s historic early work defending LGBTI rights.

Read more here…

Related articles

Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore suspended for defiance over same-sex marriage – The Washington Post

By Mark Berman 


Alabama’s top judge was suspended from the bench without pay for the remainder of his term, the state’s Court of the Judiciary said Friday.

This is the second time Roy S. Moore, chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, has been effectively pulled from office, following his ouster in 2003 over his refusal to obey judicial rulings ordering him to remove a Ten Commandments statue from the Alabama Judicial Building.

A complaint was filed by the Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission charging Moore with violating judicial ethics in issuing an order in January stating that probate judges in the state “have a ministerial duty not to issue” marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

In a 50-page judgment Friday, two days after Moore appeared for a hearing in the case, Alabama’s Court of the Judiciary found him guilty of failing to comply with the law, uphold the integrity of the court and “perform the duties of his office impartially.”


Related articles

Decision of Interest – Mortgage Foreclosure – 2nd Dept reverses SJ for bank, business records inadmissible

HSBC Mtge. Servs., Inc. v Royal (2016 NY Slip Op 05973) 


The plaintiff failed to demonstrate the admissibility of the records relied upon by Roesner under the business records exception to the hearsay rule (see CPLR 4518[a]), and, thus, failed to establish the appellant’s default in payment under the note. “A proper foundation for the admission of a business record must be provided by someone with personal knowledge of the maker’s business practices and procedures” (Citibank, N.A. v Cabrera, 130 AD3d 861, 861; see Aurora Loan Servs., LLC v Mercius, 138 AD3d 650). Roesner, who was employed by the loan servicer to U.S. Bank, did not allege that he was personally familiar with the plaintiff’s record keeping practices and procedures. Thus, Roesner failed to lay a proper foundation for the admission of records concerning the appellant’s payment history (see Citibank, N.A. v Cabrera, 130 AD3d at 861; JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A. v RADS Group, Inc., 88 AD3d 766, 767), and his assertions based on these records were inadmissible (see US Bank N.A. v Madero, 125 AD3d at 758). Inasmuch as the plaintiff’s motion was based on evidence that was not in admissible form, the plaintiff failed to establish its prima facie entitlement to judgment as a matter of law (see Aurora Loan Servs., LLC v Mercius, 138 AD3d 650).

Read full text of decision here…

Northern District Pro Bono Opportunities

Dear Northern District Bar Members, 

The Court currently has three opportunities for attorneys to volunteer as pro bono counsel for trial ready cases. Please refer to L.R. 83.3 regarding the establishment of the Pro Bono Panel of the Northern District of New York. The following cases are currently awaiting pro bono counsel:

1. 9:15-cv-771 (GTS/TWD) Lewis v. Cowan et al (Syracuse Trial) 

2. 9:15-cv-317 (GTS/TWD) Peele v. Donah et al (Syracuse Trial)

3. 9:06-cv-1308 (FJS/DEP) Kotler v. Jubert et al (Syracuse Trial) 

*Stand-by Counsel only. Trial is set for 10/19/2016

Please remember that pursuant to Local Rule 83.3 (g) attorneys who accept a pro bono appointment may seek reimbursement for expenses incident to representation of indigent clients by application to the Court. Reimbursement or advances shall be permitted to the extent possible in light of available resources and, absent extraordinary circumstances, shall not exceed $2,000.

If any firms or counsel are interested in one of the above opportunities, please contact Nicole Eallonardo in the Clerk’s Office, at Nicole_Eallonardo@nynd.uscourts.gov for further information. Accepting one of the above assignments will fulfill the requirement under Local Rule 83.3. Thank you for your attention to this matter. 

Thank you,

Lawrence K. Baerman, Clerk of Court

Louisiana Judges Issue Harsher Sentences When The LSU Football Team Loses – The Atlantic

Kids who are sentenced by college-football-loving judges who are disappointed after unexpected team losses are finding themselves behind bars for longer than kids who are sentenced after wins or predicted losses.

That’s the gist of a new working paper by a pair of economists at Louisiana State University. It sounds almost comical, like an Onion headline, at first glance: “Judge Sentences Teen to Two Years After Louisiana Tigers Fall to Wisconsin Badgers.” But, insists Naci Mocan, an economics professor at LSU and a co-author (with a fellow professor, Ozkan Eren) of “Emotional Judges and Unlucky Juveniles,” it’s not far off.


Marc Schindler, the executive director of the Justice Policy Institute and a former public defender in Baltimore, said he found the study fascinating. While he’s not convinced judges will take it to heart, he said defenders might see the study as a tool. If he was defending a kid in Louisiana in the week after a big LSU upset and knew the judge had attended the school, he might say something like, “Now, Your Honor, I know we all had a rough day on Saturday, but we all know we’re not going to let that impact our decision making…” Maybe it would backfire, but maybe it wouldn’t.

Read entire Atlantic Article here…

Related articles

%d bloggers like this: