Hawaii travel ban ruling

A federal judge in Hawaii placed a temporary restraining order on Trump’s new travel ban:

New York Pet Welfare Association v. New York City, No. 15-4013 (2d Cir. 2017) :: Justia

Plaintiffs filed suit challenging New York City’s “Sourcing Law,” which requires that pet shops sell only animals acquired from breeders holding a Class A license issued under the federal Animal Welfare Act (AWA), 7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq. Plaintiffs also challenged the “Spay/Neuter Law,” which requires that pet shops sterilize each animal before releasing it to a consumer. 

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53 Companies Back Transgender Teen in SCOTUS Fight | Law.com

BY MARCIA COYLE

Major technology companies and other businesses, warning of the negative business consequences of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling against a transgender boy’s sex discrimination claim, on Thursday stepped into a simmering controversy that pits them against the Trump administration.

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SCOTUS clerk tells amici to caption case of transgender teen with masculine pronoun

BY DEBRA CASSENS WEISS for ABA Journal

U.S. Supreme Court clerk Scott Harris has informed three groups that the caption on their amicus briefs should refer to a transgender teen with a masculine pronoun.

Harris told the groups that their reference to Gavin Grimm on the cover of their briefs violated Rule 34 of the Rules of the Supreme Court, Slate reports in a story noted by Above the Law.

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Amazon resists request for Echo info in Arkansas slaying–AP

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Amazon is resisting an effort by Arkansas prosecutors to obtain potential recordings from a slaying suspect’s Amazon Echo smart speaker, saying authorities haven’t established that their investigation is more important than a customer’s privacy rights.

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Yale and Harvard Law Deans Pull No Punches in Op-Ed on Trump | Law.com

BY KAREN SLOAN

The deans of Yale Law School and Harvard Law School have joined the growing chorus of lawyers publicly condemning President Donald Trump’s attacks on the judiciary.

In a blistering op-ed in The Boston Globe on Friday, Harvard’s Martha Minow and Yale’s Robert Post wrote that Trump’s Twitter-delivered insults against the federal judges who stayed his controversial travel ban risk making the president “an enemy of the law and the Constitution.”

“By questioning the legitimacy and authority of judges, Trump seems perilously close to characterizing the law as simply one more enemy to be smashed into submission,” the deans wrote. “At risk are the legal practices and protections that guard our freedom and our safety from the mob violence that destroyed democracies in the 1930s.”

Trump called U.S. District Court Judge James Robart, who initially stayed the travel ban, a “so-called judge” on Twitter. He then went after the appellate panel for leaving Robart’s order in place, calling their ruling “disgraceful,” among other comments. Last year, Trump accused the judge hearing a lawsuit over his Trump University of bias due to the jurist’s Mexican heritage.

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Last week, American Bar Association president Linda Klein lambasted Trump’s attack on Robart in a fiery speech delivered during the organization’s midyear meeting in Miami. “There are no ‘so-called’ judges in America,” Klein said.

“There are simply judges, fair and impartial. And we must keep it that way.”

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Foreclosure Litigation Strategy Takes Aim at Seniors, Attorneys Say | Law.com

BY SAMANTHA JOSEPH

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This, defense attorneys say, is a new strategy by lenders and plaintiffs lawyers: sue to foreclose on government-guaranteed home loans under various defaults, then fast-track these suits by filing motions for orders to show cause. These motions shift the burden of proof to the borrower, requiring them to appear in court and explain why a judge shouldn’t grant final judgment against them.

“All of a sudden, we saw a spate of foreclosures [on reverse mortgages] where the mortgage companies alleged the seniors no longer lived in the home,” said Gladys Gerson, supervising attorney for Coast to Coast Legal Aid of South Florida’s senior unit. “This has been happening around the state.”

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Corona admits he didn’t expect a hard fight when he first reviewed El Hassan’s case, but court records show he was wrong. Over the last 10 months, the ongoing litigation yielded two hearings, 40 docket entries and attempts by both sides to collect attorney fees.

When he first met El Hassan, Corona expected the plaintiff would realize the error and dismiss the suit. Without charging her or entering a notice of appearance, he placed a phone call to plaintiffs lawyers at Robertson Anschutz & Schneid in Boca Raton to say El Hassan had never moved out of her home.

Robertson Anschutz & Schneid did not respond to requests for comment, but court records show they ratcheted up the litigation with a motion for an order to show cause weeks after Corona’s phone call.

“I looked at the document. I couldn’t believe it,” Corona said. “I was in shock (at) what the bank was trying to do.”

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