Law Day 2016 Highlights Miranda Rights | United States Courts

Law Day 2016 celebrates the 50th anniversary of the landmark Miranda v. Arizona decision, focusing on its critical importance to the rights of individuals in custody, and how the ruling is applied to juveniles.

Learn more.

Schoenefeld v. State of New York

Full Text of Decision.

The court upheld N.Y. Judiciary Law § 470, requiring nonresident attorneys to maintain offices in New York State. Noting that more than 20,000 NYSBA members reside or practice outside the state, President David P. Miranda formed a working group to review the decision.

NFL v. NFL Players Association, 15-2801 (L)

Full Text of Decision

“Our role is not to determine for ourselves whether Brady participated in a scheme to deflate footballs or whether the suspension imposed by the Commissioner should have been for three games or five games or none at all,” Parker said in NFL v. NFL Players Association, 15-2801 (L). “Nor is it our role to second-guess the arbitrator’s procedural rulings. Our obligation is limited to determining whether the arbitration proceedings and award met the minimum legal standards established by the Labor Management Relations Act, 29 U.S.C. §141 et seq.

“Our review of the record yields the firm conclusion that the Commissioner properly exercised his broad discretion to resolve an intramural controversy between the League and a player,” he continued.

In dissent, Judge Robert Katzmann said “the lack of any meaningful explanation in the commissioner’s final written decision convinces me that the commissioner was doling out his own brand of industrial justice.

“It is ironic that a process designed to ensure fairness to all players has been used unfairly against one player,” he added.

Read more: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202755885437/Circuit-Reinstates-Bradys-Deflategate-Suspension#ixzz46xNhN8f8

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Pace Criminal Justice Blog — Recent #NYCA Decisions: Ineffective Assistance of Counsel

Pace Criminal Justice Blog has posted a new item, ‘Recent #NYCA Decisions:

Ineffective Assistance of Counsel’

The New York Court of Appeals has been busy on the criminal procedure front.

Last month it decided several cases, including three that addressed the issue

of ineffective assistance of defense counsel. In one, the court held that

counsel had been ineffective in failing to move to suppress a gun. In the second

and third, the […]

You may view the latest post at

http://pcjc.blogs.law.pace.edu/2016/04/21/recent-nyca-decisions-ineffective-assistance-of-counsel/

Federal appeals court sides with transgender teen, says bathroom case can go forward – The Washington Post

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A federal appeals court in Richmond has ruled that a transgender high school student who was born as a female can sue his school board on discrimination grounds because it banned him from the boys’ bathroom.

Read entire Washington Post article here.

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In a 2-to-1 decision, the 4th Circuit ordered a lower court to rehear the student’s claims that the Gloucester County, Va., school board’s bathroom policies — which restrict transgender students to using a separate unisex bathroom — violate federal law. The judges also ruled that the lower court should reconsider a request that would have allowed Grimm to use the boys’ bathroom at Gloucester High School while the case is pending.

Read full text of decision here.

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Related articles

Sui Generis–a New York law blog: Defining “Social Media” For Probationers

By Nicole Black

It seems lawyers can’t escape social media, no matter how hard we try. As I’ve written about previously, social media is now being used as evidence in cases, lawyers are using it to research jurors, and people are being charged with crimes relating to their actions taken using social media. And once those individuals are convicted, many of them are placed on probation and their use of social media is often limited by the terms of their probation.

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Of course, that gap in the Court’s analysis is a perfect example of the difficulties courts encounter when attempting to specify, limit, and define ever-changing concepts such as “social media” and “sites.” Because these concepts are constantly evolving, courts would be wise to draft broad, elastic definitions in their decisions that will withstand the test of time, lest their conclusions be rendered outdated as soon as the ink dries.

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Read entire post here.

Update Your Research And Validate Your Cases With Alternative Citators – MyCase Blog

by Lisa Solomon,

Citators have two main functions. First, they allow you to quickly locate other cases that cite a particular case. Second, they allow you to quickly identify other cases that affect the validity of a particular case.* 

While many consider Shepard’s (from LexisNexis) and KeyCite (from Thomson Reuters, home of WestlawNext) to be the “gold standard” in citators, the former is available only in connection with a Lexis Advance subscription and the latter is available only in connection with a WestawNext subscription. Here are some free alternatives to consider:

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