Real Estate Shell Companies Scheme to Defraud Owners Out of Their Homes – The New York Times


A review by The New York Times of several dozen cases, and interviews with lawyers, prosecutors and others knowledgeable about fraudulent deed transfers, suggests they are accelerating even as officials struggle to address them. The city’s Department of Finance said it was investigating 120 cases, many of them hard to crack because of the role played by LLCs, officials said. Underscoring the rising alarm over the problem, the state attorney general, Eric T. Schneiderman, and the Brooklyn borough president, Eric L. Adams, held a forum last month to warn property owners about it.


Read entire NYTIMES article here.

Proposed Uniform Attorney Discipline Rules

The state Office of Court Administration seeks comments on the proposedtUniform Rules of the Appellate Division on Attorney Discipline. The proposed rules, announced November 4, 2015, offer “a harmonized approach to the attorney disciplinary process within the four Departments of the Appellate Division,” according to OCA.

“Our Committee on Professional Discipline will review the proposal and make recommendations to our Executive Committee. We will submit our comments prior to the December 18 deadline,” said New York State Bar Association President David P. Miranda.  NYSBA members can email comments to the Association at:

The proposed OCA rules are available by clicking here and scrolling down.

State Commission Announces Chief Judge Nominees | New York Law Journal


State Commission Announces Chief Judge Nominees

The State Commission on Judicial Nominations on Thursday sent Gov. Andrew Cuomo a list of the names of seven nominees for the next New York state chief judge, none of whom are current judges on the Court of Appeals.

Read more here.

Commission Calls for Uniform Lawyer Discipline Standards | New York Law Journal

A commission appointed by Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman recommended Friday that uniform standards for attorney discipline and punishment be adopted throughout New York state and follow guidelines developed by the American Bar Association.

While the existing machinery of disciplining attorneys would remain in place in each of the four Appellate Division departments, adopting uniform discipline rules would ensure that lawyers from Long Island to Buffalo would be subject to the same punishments for the same misconduct, according to the recommendations of the Commission on Statewide Attorney Discipline.

Read more:

Related articles

Shake-Up In Legal Research: Fastcase Acquires Loislaw From Wolters-Kluwer – Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites

The legal research company Fastcase has acquired one of its prime competitors among middle-market legal research providers, Loislaw. Fastcase has purchased Loislaw from Wolters Kluwer, which had acquired it in 2000 for $95 million.

LoisLaw subscribers began receiving notices over the weekend informing them of the news. The letter stated that WK will sunset the Loislaw product effective Nov. 30, and that “we are collaborating with Fastcase so they can offer comparable subscription plans on the Fastcase platform, including Loislaw treatise libraries, at the same or lower prices as your current Loislaw subscription.”

Bob Ambrogi has all the details here.

Related articles

Judicial Conference Updates Rules for Judicial Conduct Proceedings, Strategic Plan | United States Courts

For Research, Lawyers Turn First to Free Sources, ABA Survey Says – Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites

Lawyers spend an average of 20 percent of their work time conducting legal research, and when they start a research project, they generally turn first to free online research services before using fee-based services or research materials in print or on CD-ROM.

However, with respect to online research exclusively (excluding books and CD-ROMs), lawyers are more likely to start a research project using a fee-based service than a free one. Thirty-eight percent of lawyers say they go first to a fee-based resource, while 37 percent say they start with a general search engine such as Google or Bing. Fourteen percent say they start with a bar-sponsored research service such as Fastcase or Casemaker.

These are among the findings reported in the 2015 edition of the annual Legal Technology Survey Report, compiled by the American Bar Association’s Legal Technology Resource Center. These findings are from Volume 5 of the report, covering online research.

As always, Bob has much more detail, if you click through to his complete post.


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,640 other followers

%d bloggers like this: