FORMS – Redaction of Confidential Personal Information – N.Y. State Courts

http://www.nycourts.gov/forms/redaction/

Training Video (Run time: 43 minutes)

The Administrative Board of the Courts has approved the adoption of a

new rule – section 202.5(e) of the Uniform Rules of the Supreme and

County Courts (22 NYCRR 202.5(e)) – requiring attorneys to omit or

redact certain confidential personal information from court filings in

Supreme and County Court.   This rule became effective on January 1,

2015; compliance is voluntary through February 28, 2015, and mandatory

thereafter. The new rule is included here. It covers both e-filed and

paper-filed cases.  …  Matrimonial actions, proceedings in Surrogate’s Court or

proceedings pursuant to Article 81 of the Mental Hygiene Law are

excepted from Rule 202.5(e). The Unified Court System recommends a new

form “Redaction Cover Page” … for use by persons filing

paper-filed court papers regarding confidential personal information

subject to the rule. 

The form the court recommends accompany those papers that are to be redacted. can be found at the link below:

 

http://www.nycourts.gov/forms/redaction/

Ballard v. NY Safety Track LLC 518627

Furthermore, despite the Town respondents’ insistence that

the Town was not obliged or that it was not feasible to make

available to petitioners the proposed 2013 agreement before it

was put to a vote, we affirm that part of Supreme Court’s

judgment as found that the Town’s conduct in that regard denied

petitioners “any meaningful participation” in the process leading

to the final adoption of the controversial 2013 agreement, in

clear contravention of Public Officers Law § 103 (e).

NYSBA | Fastcase 2015 Programs

NYSBA
KNOWLEDGE
NETWORK

Advanced Legal Research Using Fastcase 
FREE 1.0 MCLE credit webinar

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m 

REGISTER

As a benefit of membership in NYSBA, members receive free and unlimited access to the following libraries through Fastcase:  N.Y. Court of Appeals, Appellate Division decisions, Miscellaneous decisions, N.Y. Consolidated Laws, N.Y.C.R.R., N.Y.S. Constitution, U.S. Code, 2d Circuit decisions, and Supreme Court decisions.


Advanced Legal Research Using Fastcase 

Already familiar with basic legal research? Now it’s time for the master class. Fastcase CEO Ed Walters will teach you advanced legal research using Fastcase, the NYSBA’s free legal research member benefit. 

This session will help you find answers that traditional legal research would miss, using 4D visual maps of results, citation analysis, and legal research safety nets like Forecite. It will cover statutory research and free mobile apps for iPhone, iPad, and Android, and how to sync these apps with your NYSBA subscription to Fastcase. 

1.0 MCLE Credit 
Newly admitted attorneys cannot receive MCLE credits for participation in CLE webcasts.

NYSBA Members – Free 
This program is only open to NYSBA Members.  You can renew your membership online at www.nysba.org/Membership

REGISTER 

TODAY

Questions about the Program? Contact Kathy Suchocki, Director, Law Practice Management at 518-487-5590 or ksuchocki@nysba.org, or Simone Smith, LPM Program Coordinator at 518-487-5591 or ssmith@nysba.org.

Register by phone: Call 1-800-582-2452.

Washington state moves around UPL, using legal technicians to help close the justice gap

Robert Ambrogi has written a comprehensive survey of moves across the country in the use of legal technicians.  You might be surprised (or not) to learn that New York Sate is in the forefront of this movement.

***

“Even with whatever success we’ve had with public funding of legal services and pro bono work by lawyers, there is still a gaping hole in our system of providing legal services to the poor and people of limited means,” says New York Court of Appeals Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, who has emerged as a leading advocate of allowing nonlawyers to provide limited services.

“We need to think out of the box and look at every possible avenue for filling this justice gap,” Lippman says. “You can get nonlawyers who are experts in a particular area of legal assistance and who can be more effective in that area than a generalist lawyer.”

***

In May 2013, Lippman appointed a committee with the specific charge of studying this issue, the Committee on Non-Lawyers and the Justice Gap. He asked the committee to focus on the use of nonlawyers in housing, elder law and consumer credit cases–areas where as many as 90 percent of litigants in the New York courts are without lawyers.

NEW YORK’S NAVIGATORS

The recommendations of this committee resulted in Lippman’s launch in February 2014 of a pilot program in which nonlawyers, called navigators, provide free assistance to unrepresented litigants in housing cases in Brooklyn and consumer debt cases in the Bronx and Brooklyn. Navigators provide a range of assistance, from general information given at help desks to one-on-one help completing legal forms and assisting in settlement negotiations.

Navigators may also accompany unrepresented litigants into the courtroom. While they are not allowed to act as advocates in court, they are able to answer questions from the judge and to provide the litigants “moral support.”

In Albany, Lippman created a second project that uses nonlawyers to advise elderly and homebound residents about their eligibility for benefits and other services…

***

Read Ambrogi’s complete article with more about New York programs by clicking the link below:

http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/washington_state_moves_around_upl_using_legal_technicians_to_help_close_the

Division of Code Enforcement and Administration-New York State Dept of State

On Monday January 12, 2015, the New York Department of State adopted a regulation that fixes the time within which a person served with an Order to Remedy violation(s) of the Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code (Uniform Code) must comply with that Order.  Specifically, the regulation provides that an Order to Remedy a condition in violation of the Uniform Code must state that full compliance with the Order is required within 30 days after the date of the Order.

The regulation was added as a new section 1203.5 to 19 NYCRR Part 1203.  Part 1203 establishes minimum standards for administration and enforcement of the Uniform Code.  All cities, towns, villages, counties, and State agencies that are responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Uniform Code are required to comply with Part 1203, including the newly added section 1203.5.  

Adoption of this regulation as an emergency rule makes it effective immediately upon filing.  

***

  1. ALL ORDERS TO REMEDY ISSUED ON OR AFTER JANUARY 12, 2015 MUST STATE THE DATE OF THE ORDER AND MUST INCLUDE A STATEMENT SUBSTANTIALLY SIMILAR TO THE FOLLOWING: 

NOTICE: Full compliance with this order to remedy is required by _____ [specify date], which is thirty (30) days after the date of this order. If the person or entity served with this order to remedy fails to comply in full with this order to remedy within the thirty (30) day period, that person or entity will be subject to a fine of not more than $1,000 per day of violation, or imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both.

See 19 NYCRR 1203.5(b).

***

  1. ALL ORDERS TO REMEDY ISSUED ON OR AFTER JANUARY 12, 2015 MUST BE SERVED, PERSONALLY OR BY CERTIFIED OR REGISTERED MAIL, WITHIN FIVE (5) DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE ORDER.  See 19 NYCRR 1203.5(c).  This requirement ensures that the person served with an Order to Remedy has at least 25 days following the date of service of the Order in which to comply with the Order. NOTE:  If the city, town, village or State agency issuing an Order to Remedy does not serve the Order within five days of the date of the Order, the city, town, village or State agency must issue a new Order, and should ensure than the new Order is served within 5 days of the date of the new Order.

  2. ***

  3. Read more about this new procedure here.

Know Your Rights: Housing and Arrests or Criminal Convictions | The Bronx Defenders

A criminal history can affect your eligibility for both public housing and, if a landlord conducts a background check, private housing. An arrest – even before anyone is found guilty – can often trigger eviction of you or your entire household from public or private housing.

Federally Subsidized Housing(NYCHA & Section 8)

Federally subsidized housing includes all public housing developments (such as NYCHA in New York City and RHA in Rochester) and Section 8. Rules in subsidized housing can be very strict, and even minor arrests or criminal convictions can affect your right to stay in public housing. This section includes information about “Admissions” – or the rules guiding when your criminal conviction might prevent you from living in public housing, even if your family lives there, and about “Termination of Tenancy” – or eviction based on criminal justice involvement. Most of the information here is specific to the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) and to Section 8 administered by NYCHA. To find out about the laws specific to your city or county use LawHelp/NY (www.lawhelp.org/ny) to find a housing legal services provider in your area.

Admissions- Getting into housing with a criminal record

Public housing agencies and Section 8 providers can and do obtain criminal records of applicants and tenants. Much of the information in this section is based on How to Get Section 8 or Public Housing Even With a Criminal Record, a publication of the Legal Action Center.

– See more at: http://www.bronxdefenders.org/housing-and-arrests-or-criminal-convictions/#sthash.r1DYLJKF.dpuf

***

Hat Tip to:

Jimmy Lathrop 

www.ParkSlopeLawyer.com 

***

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Paralegal Studies — Rockland Community College

Are you thinking of hiring a paralegal?

If so, please consider a current paralegal student or graduate from RCC’s American Bar Association approved Paralegal Program.

  • Courses our students take include:
    Civil Litigation, Real Estate Practice, Domestic Relations, Computer Legal Applications, Legal Research and Writing, and Estate Administration and Probate
  • Students complete assignments that they would be expected to fulfill as a paralegal in a law firm
  • Our students are willing to fill full-time, part-time and/or temporary positions


    Please contact us to help find the appropriate paralegal for your firm.
    JENNIFER L. FREDEMAN, ESQ.
    Job Placement Coordinator/Adjunct faculty Paralegal Studies
    Rockland Community College mailto:jfredema@sunyrockland.edu

    “Choosing the Paralegal program at RCC was the best educational decision I could have made. The faculty was very helpful in the classroom and beyond. I apply the skills I learned at RCC every day at work. Thanks to the Paralegal program and the job placement service, I have gained entry into a rewarding career.”
    – Jordan Gaspard, 2014 Graduate
    Paralegal Studies 845-574-4169 www.sunyrockland.edu
    ***
    Related articles
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