Connect with Law Students Seeking Experience with Rural Law Practitioner

We are writing to follow up on an earlier survey wherein you indicated your interest in connecting with law students. The results of this previous survey, done by our Government Law Center, are summarized in this report, which highlights the growing shortage of rural law practitioners. We would like to gain more information about your practice and your ability to host or hire an Albany Law School student. We will use this information only for the purpose of creating a possible fit between your law practice and an Albany Law School student. Please take a few moments to complete the survey here.

Also, feel free to forward the survey to other rural attorneys in your networks that would benefit from this partnership.

The survey will be open for a limited time only.

If you have any questions about this survey please contact Mary Walsh Fitzpatrick, Assistant Dean at the Career and Professional Development Center at (518) 445-2377 or mfitz@albanylaw.edu.

Thank you.

Albany Law School | 80 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, NY 12208 | (518) 445-2332 | careers@albanylaw.edu

NYPD failed to find one incident of biased policing in five years

By Tina Moore

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The NYPD received 2,495 reports of biased policing since it began investigating allegations from the public five years ago — but cops haven’t substantiated a single complaint, a new city report has found.

The Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Investigation released a report Wednesday that said the complaints were based on race, national origin and sexual orientation.
But the report shows that NYPD officials have “never substantiated an allegation of biased policing.”

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Read more…

Read the city’s report. NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF INVESTIGATION

NYPD failed to find one incident of biased policing in five years

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The NYPD received 2,495 reports of biased policing since it began investigating allegations from the public five years ago — but cops haven’t substantiated a single complaint, a new city report has found.

The Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Investigation released a report Wednesday that said the complaints were based on race, national origin and sexual orientation.
But the report shows that NYPD officials have “never substantiated an allegation of biased policing.”

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Read more…

Read the city’s report. NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF INVESTIGATION

Judiciary Creates Public User Group for PACER | United States Courts

 

The federal Judiciary has created and is seeking members for a public user group to provide advice and feedback on ways to improve its electronic public access services. The Electronic Public Access (EPA) Public User Group membership will be selected from interested applicants who represent the legal sector, media, academia, government agencies, the public, and other entities that use the Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER) system to access federal court records.

Learn more.

Federal judge blocks ICE from making civil immigration arrests at courthouses

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On Thursday, a federal judge in Boston granted a preliminary injunction that blocks U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement from making civil arrests at state courthouses in Massachusetts.

U.S. District Judge Indira Talwani ruled in a suit filed by two district attorneys, public defenders and immigration advocates, report the Boston Globe, the Boston Herald, the New England Public Radio and USA Today. The Marshall Project noted the decision.

It is thought to be the first time a judge has enjoined civil courthouse arrests of people who are in the country illegally.

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Read more…

Today’s Law Student Wellness Programs | Best Practices for Legal Education

Stephen Gallagher
Stephen Gallagher
There was a time in the not-so-distance past when wellness programs in U.S. law schools primarily focused on preventing substance abuse and suicide. Professor Mary Lynch of Albany Law Schools, editor of the Best Practices for Legal Education Blog writes about how Law Student Wellness Programs have changed.

Best Practices for Legal Education was created with two goals in mind:

1) to create a useful web-based source of information on current reforms in legal education arising from the publication of Roy Stuckey’s Best Practices for Legal Education and the Carnegie Foundation’s Educating Lawyers; and

2) to create a place where those interested in the future of legal education can freely exchange ideas, concerns, and opinions.  The blog contributors and editor document and record the most recent innovations and academic experiments accompanying the legal education reform movement – and stimulate dialogue between and among all sectors of the legal academy.

Today’s Law Student Wellness Programs | Best Practices for Legal Education

Stephen Gallagher
Stephen Gallagher
There was a time in the not-so-distance past when wellness programs in U.S. law schools primarily focused on preventing substance abuse and suicide. Professor Mary Lynch of Albany Law Schools, editor of the Best Practices for Legal Education Blog writes about how Law Student Wellness Programs have changed.

Best Practices for Legal Education was created with two goals in mind:

1) to create a useful web-based source of information on current reforms in legal education arising from the publication of Roy Stuckey’s Best Practices for Legal Education and the Carnegie Foundation’s Educating Lawyers; and

2) to create a place where those interested in the future of legal education can freely exchange ideas, concerns, and opinions.  The blog contributors and editor document and record the most recent innovations and academic experiments accompanying the legal education reform movement – and stimulate dialogue between and among all sectors of the legal academy.

Cruel confinement: Judge halts use of solitary cell for mentally-ill teen; says 17-year-old suffered ‘irreparable harm’ – New York Daily News

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A federal judge in New York blocks prison officials from holding a mentally ill teenager in solitary confinement for months on end. Corrections officers respond by shipping the boy to the general population at a prison farther away from his home. NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Opinion | Is the Show ‘Cops’ Committing Crimes Itself? – The New York Times

By Dan Taberski

Mr. Taberski is a documentary filmmaker and podcaster.

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The podcast I host is the product of an 18-month investigation by me and my producers. What we found is that “Cops” is edited far more problematically than it lets on, that it consistently presents excessive force as good policing and that its structural reinforcement of racial stereotypes about criminality raises questions about the ethics of continuing to let the show remain on the air. Above all, the questionable legality of several actions taken by “Cops” producers and their Police Department partners should lead every American state and city to assess whether they should allow reality shows about the police to film in their jurisdictions.

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Dan Taberski (@dtaberski) is a documentary filmmaker and the host of the podcast “Headlong: Running From ‘Cops.'”

June 2019 House of Delegates Meeting on Vimeo

C. Bruce Lawrence
Jun 18, 2019 2:27 PM
C. Bruce Lawrence
I strongly urge (Senior Lawyer) Section Members to watch Hank Greenberg’s address to the House of Delegates on Saturday setting forth the history of NYSBA’s creation and his vision for its future. You can go to this link to the video of the meeting and go to 25.00 minutes to start to stream his message.

vimeo.com/342748678

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C. Bruce Lawrence Esq., Immediate Past Chair
Boylan Code LLP
Rochester NY
(585) 232-5300 x256
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