Samsung may be ruining your iPhone 6s’ battery life | Cult of Mac



There’s no way to tell if you’re buying a Samsung A9 processor or a TSMC A9 processor when you purchase your new device online or in stores. However, if you want to know which chip your iPhone 6s is packing, you download the free app Lirum Device Info Lite to discover which processor you’re packing.


Read entire article.

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What’s new in iOS 9 – iPhone J.D.

Jeff Richardson:

Yesterday, Apple released iOS 9 for the iPhone and iPad.  It is a solid, free upgrade that adds some great new features.  The new Notes app is particularly nice, with support for inserting pictures, creating checklists (great for a packing list), etc.  The split view will help me to be even more productive on my iPad. 

But I’m just as excited about all of the tiny improvements, each of which makes your day-to-day usage of the iPhone and iPad so much better.  For example:

  • The keys on the keyboard change to uppercase or lowercase letters depending upon the mode.  Thus, you no longer have to stare at the shift key and try to guess whether it is on or off.  Amen.
  • When you hold down the home button on the iPhone to activate Siri, you no longer get an audible beep and instead just get a discreet vibration.
  • You can swipe from left to right on your first home screen to perform a search, but that page also gives you helpful shortcuts that Siri thinks that you might want to use, such as recent contacts, apps you are likely to want to launch, etc.  It is a little thing that makes the iPhone faster and easier to use.  I really like it.
  • Third parties can now add themselves to that Siri search screen.  For example, I use 1Password to store my passwords.  I can now swipe to the search screen and type “Apple ID” to see an entry for my Apple ID password in the 1Password app.  When I tap it, the 1Password app launches directly to that entry so that I can quickly see my long and complicated password.  Other apps can also add themselves to the search screen.
  • The system font on the iPhone used to be Helvetica Neue, but in iOS 9 it changes to an Apple-designed font called San Francisco, the font used on the Apple Watch.  It is a subtle change, but I find it easier to read.

For more information on everything that is new, I have two sets of recommended articles.

Thinking about buying a new iPhone? Read this first. – The Washington Post

Apple’s begun taking preorders for the new iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, and by all accounts, it looks like another record launch. A lot has happened in the wireless industry since the last time Apple released a new iPhone: All four national cellular carriers — AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint — have moved away from the traditional two-year contract, that familiar arrangement that tied you to your carrier but let you buy a basic iPhone at a subsidized price of $199.

This shift away from device subsidies means millions of Americans for the first time will be expected to cover the full price of their phones — $649 or more, in the case of the iPhone. But the range of choices is more likely to confuse than to clarify. You can buy. You can lease. Some offer promotional pricing; others don’t. You can pay for the phone in installments. But how many? Twelve? Eighteen? Twenty-four? Thirty?

Into this mix comes Apple, which just announced a new plan of its own that lets you pay for an iPhone over 24 months and upgrade every 12 months.

For reasons we’ll get into below, we think Apple’s new iPhone upgrade plan will be right for many people, and it could even reshape the face of the cellular industry. But it’s not for everyone. In fact, even though it’s aimed at simplifying everything, the addition of a new choice from Apple threatens to add complexity to an already confusing jumble of payment plans.

Choice give you flexibility. But it also adds complexity, which is why we’ve tried to narrow down the options based on four common consumer archetypes. iPhone shoppers should ask themselves what they value most: Is it price? Is it the ability to upgrade the device whenever you want? Do you want to own the device? Or do you just like the way things were?

Check out the detailed analysis by the Washington Post of your choices for buying a new iPhone.

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Apple’s fall lineup | The Download Blog – CNET

Apple has fresh versions of the iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, and Apple Watch, plus iOS 9, TvOS, and WatchOS.

by Joshua Rotter September 9, 2015, 11:17 PM

In San Francisco this morning, Apple unveiled its latest iPhone 6s, updates to the Apple Watch, a new Apple TV, and a wide-body tablet named the iPad Pro. With the new electronics comes new software, including iOS 9 and WatchOS 2 (both due September 16), El Capitan (possibly coming September 30), and TvOS and an app store for Apple TV (October). Apple’s fall line highlights the path the company hopes to take into the living room and the enterprise.

Read entire article here.

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A New Appellate Court Opinion on “Pocket Dialing” – Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Tips Blog

Yes, I know we all call it something else other than “pocket dialing,” but congratulations to the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals for using a more polite term.

Huff vs Spaw (Download in PDF) was issued this week.

Click here to read the entire article on this techno-law issue.

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How to download the iOS 9 public beta | iMore


iOS 9 marks the first time Apple has ever released a new version of the iPhone and iPad operating system as a public beta. That means more people than ever before will be able to test it out, try the new and enhanced features, and provide feedback before it goes into wide release this fall. But it also means people will have to go through the public beta download and install process. While it’s not complicated, is is new and different. So, we’re going to walk you through it and give you a place to ask questions if you need extra help. 

Warning: Beta means beta. This isn’t an early access program. It’s pre-release software. That means put it on a secondary device if you have one and, if you don’t, think really hard before installing it on your primary device. If you rely on your iPhone or iPad for critical communications or to run your life or business, you may want to stay clear until the official release this fall.


Click here to read entire “how to” article.

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Worker fired for disabling GPS app that tracked her 24 hours a day [Updated] | Ars Technica

by  David Kravets –  May 11, 2015 

A Central California woman claims she was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her company issued iPhone–an app that tracked her every move 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Plaintiff Myrna Arias, a former Bakersfield sales executive for money transfer service Intermex, claims in a state court lawsuit that her boss, John Stubits, fired her shortly after she uninstalled the job-management Xora app that she and her colleagues were required to use. According to her suit (PDF) in Kern County Superior Court:

Read more here.

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