Apple Reportedly Blocked Police iPhone Hacking Tool and Nobody Knows How–GIZMODO

Apple’s latest iteration of iOS has reportedly turned the GrayKey hacking device into an expensive doorstop. Law enforcement around the world has taken to using GrayKey to break into locked iPhones but it appears Apple has finally gotten ahead of the device’s crafty manufacturers. For now.

Forbes’ Thomas Brewster has been on top of the GrayKey saga from the beginning. On Wednesday, he cited sources from the forensic community who’ve told him that Apple’s efforts to keep bad actors and law enforcement from cracking into its users’ phones have paid off. According to the report, the $15,000 tool made by a shadowy company called Grayshift is now only capable of performing a “partial extraction” of data. It can pull a few unencrypted files and some metadata that’s virtually worthless.

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A suspect is forced by the FBI to unlock an iPhone using facial recognition–ABA Journal

An Apple iPhone X user, suspected of possessing child pornography, was forced by the FBI use facial recognition to unlock their phone.

ForbesEndgadget and CNET all have coverage.

Forbes reports this is the first known case where law enforcement in any country has compelled someone to unlock their phone using Apple Face ID.

On Aug. 10, the FBI searched the Columbus, Ohio, home of Grant Michalski. Using his face, Michalski unlocked his phone at the FBI’s request, at which point the agent was able to go through chats, photos and any other accessible material.

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Review: iPhone XS — amazing screen, fantastic pictures, and more – iPhone J.D.

Jeff Richardson

Last year’s iPhone X was, in my opinion, the most significant year-to-year advance in iPhone technology…How do you follow up on an act like that?  Apple actually has some experience in this area.  It adds nice but incremental improvements to the prior year model, and then to indicate that it is a less significant upgrade, Apple adds an “s” to the name… An “s” year iPhone doesn’t mean that there are no big new features.  For example, the iPhone 4S added Siri and the iPhone 5S added a way to authenticate without typing a password (Touch ID), and both of those features remain critical parts of the iPhone.  But in an “s” year, hardware changes are typically less noticeable.

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Woman sues US Customs over data copied from seized iPhone – Naked Security

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On Thursday, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a Muslim civil rights group, announced that its New Jersey chapter had filed a case in federal court challenging the CBP’s “warrantless and unconstitutional seizure” of an American citizen’s phone.

Lazoja formally asked a federal judge to force border officials to delete data copied from her iPhone 6S Plus – a legal filing that’s formally known as a Rule 41(g) Motion, or as a Motion to Return Property.

It’s not her physical phone that she wants back. She got that back after 130 days.

Rather, she specifically wants assurances that copies of her data are deleted. As CAIR points out, Rule 41(g) motions are generally used for tangible items, as opposed to easily copied data. But it’s those easily made copies that she wants wiped out: copies that were taken without the CBP explaining its reason for seizure.

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Logitech Crayon Review & Rating | PCMag.com

By Elisabeth Sullivan

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Students and teachers disappointed by the Apple Pencil‘s flaws–its easily losable cap, its tendency to roll away, and of course, its high $99 price (or $89 for schools)–finally have the perfect solution: The Logitech Crayon. Through an Apple Education representative, schools (and only schools) can purchase the kid-friendly Crayon stylus for $49.95, compatible with the current (sixth-generation) iPad, for taking notes and drawing in the classroom. It’s every bit as functional as the Apple Pencil, and in some cases even more so, earning it our Editors’ Choice.
 

Yelp for Cops | The Marshall Project

By SIMONE WEICHSELBAUM

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In April, the NYPD informally introduced its public opinion monitor, also known as the “sentiment meter,” during CompStat, the weekly meetings in which top brass interrogate precinct commanders about crime trends. Precincts now receive a monthly “trust score” along with rankings that measure overall satisfaction with police performance and how safe residents feel. The data is culled from questionnaires administered through about 50,000 smartphone apps, including Candy Crush and WeatherBug, as well as traditional landline calls. Facebook and Instagram began to advertise links to the surveys in June.
 
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What Your Email Address Says About Your Law Practice – Technologist

By George Khoury, Esq.

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When you see another lawyer’s email address, do you judge them on it? If not, you might start after reading this.

Apparently, some lawyers believe that the @gmail.com, @yahoo.com, @hotmail.com, or @aol.com accounts should be kept personal, and that a lawyer’s email address should always be an @your-law-firm-name-here.com type address. However, this belief isn’t always correct, and could lead many lawyers down a primrose path of being hacked for using a garbage email client that lacks adequate security.

Fortunately, thanks to the modern times we live in, email addresses can be quickly and easily changed. Below you’ll find a few tips on whether you need to be shopping for a new email.

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