For Sole Practitioners, the Future’s Not What It Used to Be

For Sole Practitioners, the Future’s Not What It Used to Be

by Stephen P. Gallagher and Leonard E. Sienko, Jr. 

(NYSBA Journal, Oct. 2015)

The nitty-gritty – and the joys – of a solo practice in the new (and changing) world order.

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Elephind.com: Search the world’s historic newspaper archives

Elephind

https://www.elephind.com/

An interesting complement to the comprehensive newspaper collections held by many libraries, Elephind is something of a boutique collection. The digital newspaper collections search engine contains 2,705 fully digitized newspaper titles, provided by about 21 library partners, that range from the Door County Library (Wisconsin) with one title, to the US Library of Congress with 1,060 titles and The National Library of Australia somewhere in between, at 681. With that range, Elephind is not going to answer all questions, but should be able to provide a wealth of information for some inquiries. For example, I found nothing on my paternal grandfather, whose obituary appeared in the New York Times in 1952. Observing that the Digital Daily Kent Stater Archive is part of Elephind, I tried a search for “kent state shooting 1971” and retrieved 33 results, but it was difficult to eliminate false drops such as “kent” in a personal name. For effective use of this search engine, check the list of newspaper titles carefully – if a user is seeking information on a topic that was covered in one of the titles in Elephind, good results should be retrieved. Otherwise, it is a something of a needle in a haystack search. [DS]

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2015. https://www.scout.wisc.edu

WARNING From The Editor:  You can waste a lot of time looking up mentions of yourself in your college newspaper from 50 years ago

Commission Calls for Uniform Lawyer Discipline Standards | New York Law Journal

A commission appointed by Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman recommended Friday that uniform standards for attorney discipline and punishment be adopted throughout New York state and follow guidelines developed by the American Bar Association.

While the existing machinery of disciplining attorneys would remain in place in each of the four Appellate Division departments, adopting uniform discipline rules would ensure that lawyers from Long Island to Buffalo would be subject to the same punishments for the same misconduct, according to the recommendations of the Commission on Statewide Attorney Discipline.

Read more: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202738198657/Commission-Calls-for-Uniform-Lawyer-Discipline-Standards#ixzz3mm5VGzZ7

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ACA Information Center for Applicable Large Employers (ALEs)

New IRS Resource helps Employers Understand the Health Care Law

The following article can be posted on your websites and used in other communication vehicles to help employers get the facts about the new IRS web page for applicable large employers.

The new ACA Information Center for Applicable Large Employers page on IRS.gov features information and resources for employers of all sizes on how the health care law may affect them if they fit the definition of an applicable large employer.

The web page includes the following sections:

  • What’s Trending for ALEs,
  • How to Determine if You are an ALE,
  • Resources for Applicable Large Employers, and
  • Outreach Materials.

Visitors to the new page will find links to:

  • Detailed information about tax provisions including information reporting requirements for employers,
  • Questions and answers, and
  • Forms, instructions, publications, health care tax tips, flyers and videos.

Although the vast majority of employers will not be affected, you should determine if you are an applicable large employer.  If you averaged at least 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees, during 2014, you are most likely an ALE for 2015.  If you have fewer than 50 full-time employees, you may be considered an applicable large employer if you share a common ownership with other employers. As an applicable large employer, you should be taking steps now to prepare for the coming filing season. 

In 2016, applicable large employers must file an annual information return – and provide a statement to each full-time employee – reporting whether they offered health insurance, and if so, what insurance they offered their employees. 

If you will file 250 or more information returns for 2015, you must file the returns electronically through the ACA Information Reports system.  You should review draft Publication 5165, Guide for Electronically Filing Affordable Care Act (ACA) Information Returns, now for information on the communication procedures, transmission formats, business rules and validation procedures for returns that you must transmit in 2016.

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Shake-Up In Legal Research: Fastcase Acquires Loislaw From Wolters-Kluwer – Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites

The legal research company Fastcase has acquired one of its prime competitors among middle-market legal research providers, Loislaw. Fastcase has purchased Loislaw from Wolters Kluwer, which had acquired it in 2000 for $95 million.

LoisLaw subscribers began receiving notices over the weekend informing them of the news. The letter stated that WK will sunset the Loislaw product effective Nov. 30, and that “we are collaborating with Fastcase so they can offer comparable subscription plans on the Fastcase platform, including Loislaw treatise libraries, at the same or lower prices as your current Loislaw subscription.”

Bob Ambrogi has all the details here.

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Judicial Conference Updates Rules for Judicial Conduct Proceedings, Strategic Plan | United States Courts

What’s new in iOS 9 – iPhone J.D.

Jeff Richardson:

Yesterday, Apple released iOS 9 for the iPhone and iPad.  It is a solid, free upgrade that adds some great new features.  The new Notes app is particularly nice, with support for inserting pictures, creating checklists (great for a packing list), etc.  The split view will help me to be even more productive on my iPad. 

But I’m just as excited about all of the tiny improvements, each of which makes your day-to-day usage of the iPhone and iPad so much better.  For example:

  • The keys on the keyboard change to uppercase or lowercase letters depending upon the mode.  Thus, you no longer have to stare at the shift key and try to guess whether it is on or off.  Amen.
  • When you hold down the home button on the iPhone to activate Siri, you no longer get an audible beep and instead just get a discreet vibration.
  • You can swipe from left to right on your first home screen to perform a search, but that page also gives you helpful shortcuts that Siri thinks that you might want to use, such as recent contacts, apps you are likely to want to launch, etc.  It is a little thing that makes the iPhone faster and easier to use.  I really like it.
  • Third parties can now add themselves to that Siri search screen.  For example, I use 1Password to store my passwords.  I can now swipe to the search screen and type “Apple ID” to see an entry for my Apple ID password in the 1Password app.  When I tap it, the 1Password app launches directly to that entry so that I can quickly see my long and complicated password.  Other apps can also add themselves to the search screen.
  • The system font on the iPhone used to be Helvetica Neue, but in iOS 9 it changes to an Apple-designed font called San Francisco, the font used on the Apple Watch.  It is a subtle change, but I find it easier to read.

For more information on everything that is new, I have two sets of recommended articles.

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