Regulation and the Local Food Movement | The Regulatory Review

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The local food movement has been booming over the last several years. The number of farmers’ markets across the country has nearly doubled in the last decade, and a recent Pew Research Center poll found that a majority of people in the United States had bought locally grown produce in the previous month. The enormous interest in eating locally has even led to the coinage of a new word: locavore.

Local food production and consumption offer a variety of benefits, which two legal scholars, Patricia Salkin and Amy Lavine, discuss in a recent paper. Because of these purported benefits, Salkin and Lavine argue that local and state governments should follow the example of some of their peers and update their zoning and land use regulations to encourage more local food production.

Salkin and Lavine tout the advantages of “foodsheds”–geographic areas surrounding urban areas that can provide some of the food that city-dwellers consume. For instance, Salkin and Lavine point to potential environmental benefits: Small farms may use fewer chemicals and produce less waste than large industrial farms. And it requires much less fuel to transport produce to a nearby city than it does to transport produce across the country.

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Illinois and New York Pass First Statewide Bans on the Use of Elephants in Entertainment | Animal Legal Defense Fund

Posted by Nicole Pallotta, Academic Outreach Manager on November 17, 2017

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Soon after, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed New York’s SB 2098B, also known as the “Elephant Protection Act,” into law on October 19, 2017. It amends the state’s Agriculture and Markets Law and its Environmental Conservation Law to prohibit the use of elephants in entertainment acts. The New York law does not specifying “traveling” acts but expressly exempts accredited zoos and aquariums. It takes effect in two years.  In contrast to the Illinois law, which makes violation a Class A misdemeanor, the New York law provides a civil penalty of up to $1,000 for each violation because offenses against animals are not part of New York’s Penal Code.

The legislation was drafted by undergraduate students in Pace University’s Environmental Policy Clinic, who also lobbied for its passage and collected student signatures in support of the bill. Several New York chapters of the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund submitted letters in support of the bill to Governor Cuomo over the summer.

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Depression and the Legal Profession – Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Tips Blog

Jim Calloway:
Did you know that students entering law school have same rate of depression as the general population (approximately 7%), but by the time they finish their first year of law school 34% experience depression? This statistic is from a new book from the ABA, The Full Weight of the Law: How Legal Professionals Can Recognize and Rebound from Depression.
 
I’m no expert, but that statistic indicates something is wrong. It is well documented that lawyers suffer from depression and problems related to stress and depression at rates greater than the general public.

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Ciao, Chrome: Firefox Quantum Is The Browser Built for 2017 | WIRED

IT’S BEEN YEARS since I gave a second thought to my web browser. Safari’s fine, Microsoft Edge is whatever, I think Opera still exists? None have ever offered much reason to switch away from Chrome, Google’s fast, simple web tool. I’m not the only one who feels this way, either: Chrome commands nearly 60 percent of the browser market, and is more than four times as popular as the second-place finisher, Firefox. Chrome won the browser wars.

So my expectations for Firefox Quantum, the new browser from Mozilla, were not particularly high.

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Barred From the Bar: The Winding Road From Prisoner to Lawyer – Big Law Business

By  – Bloomberg
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As the U.S. prison population has surged over the decades, the legal profession’s distaste for former inmates has become more conspicuous.
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Roughly 70 million people in the U.S. are estimated to have a criminal record of some kind, and nearly 700,000 are released from incarceration annually, according to the National Employment Law Project. More than 60 percent of formerly incarcerated people are unemployed a year after their release, according to the Sentencing Project, and those who do find work take home 40 percent a year less than those who haven’t served time.

Nationwide, 150 cities and counties have adopted laws that prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their criminal histories, as part of the “ban the box”movement.

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Federal judge blocks Trump’s executive order on denying funding to sanctuary cities – The Washington Post

A federal judge issued an injunction to permanently block President Trump’s executive order to deny funding to cities that refused to cooperate with federal immigration officials, after finding the order unconstitutional.

The ruling by District Judge William H. Orrick in San Francisco comes in response to a lawsuit filed by the city of San Francisco and nearby Santa Clara County and follows a temporary halt on the order that the judge issued in April.

Orrick, in his summary of the case Monday, found that the Trump administration’s efforts to move local officials to cooperate with its efforts to deport undocumented immigrants violated the separation of powers doctrine as well as the Fifth and Tenth amendments.

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Dementia Science and the Law | Live & Webcast

This timely program will address the fragility of the human brain and how and by whom capacity determinations are made for and/or on behalf of the millions of adult Americans who have diminished mental capacity, including the estimated five million Americans who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s diseases.  Special emphasis will be placed on the tensions between lawyers and healthcare professionals as to how, where, and by whom such capacity determinations should be made.

Sponsored by the Committee on Continuing Legal Education and Elder Law and Special Needs, Health Law and Senior Lawyers Sections

Thursday, December, 14, 2017

8:30 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.

Live CLE Program & Webcast

The Core Club
66 East 55th Street
New York, NY 10022

4.5 MCLE Credits | 3.5 Professional Practice | 1.0 Ethics

NYSBA Member Price: $135 | Non-member: $235

Co-Sponsoring Section Member: $110

www.nysba.org/DementiaCLE

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Kathleen Plog
New York State Bar Association
kplog@nysba.org (518) 487-5681
Albany, NY