Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore suspended for defiance over same-sex marriage – The Washington Post

By Mark Berman 


Alabama’s top judge was suspended from the bench without pay for the remainder of his term, the state’s Court of the Judiciary said Friday.

This is the second time Roy S. Moore, chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, has been effectively pulled from office, following his ouster in 2003 over his refusal to obey judicial rulings ordering him to remove a Ten Commandments statue from the Alabama Judicial Building.

A complaint was filed by the Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission charging Moore with violating judicial ethics in issuing an order in January stating that probate judges in the state “have a ministerial duty not to issue” marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

In a 50-page judgment Friday, two days after Moore appeared for a hearing in the case, Alabama’s Court of the Judiciary found him guilty of failing to comply with the law, uphold the integrity of the court and “perform the duties of his office impartially.”


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ABA Free Legal Answers is a website where members of the public can go to post basic legal questions that attorneys can answer for free.  The client can create an account on the website after completing a short screening questionnaire to determine if they qualify (based on income), and agreeing to the limited scope of representation that the website offers.  Similarly, any attorney in New York can create an account on the website after completing a brief limited scope representation tutorial (developed by Judge Fern Fisher) and agreeing to the terms of the program.

Attorneys may, at their leisure, log on to the website and respond to questions posted by members of the public.  Attorneys may select which questions to answer by previewing questions, which can be sorted by practice area so they can easily see which questions fall within their areas expertise. 

This will allow attorneys of all types to do pro bono work from any location for any length of time.  This will provide attorneys who may have difficulty doing pro bono work (government attorneys, retired attorneys, rural attorneys, etc.) an opportunity to do pro bono work in a way that fits their lifestyles. will be going live at the end of August.  In order to adequately test out the platform and respond to questions submitted by members of the public in its early stages, I am seeking out 100 volunteers who are interested in learning more about the project and using the site.  The target launch date is currently scheduled for August 23rd.  If you are interested in learning more about volunteering, please fill out this form and send it back to me.  You may also share the form with any trusted colleagues who may be interested in participating.

Please note that there is absolutely no obligation here.  I am simply seeking out people who are interested in learning more about the project so that I may provide them with more information about it closer to the launch date.  At that point, I can provide more guidance to those participating in the test panel so they know exactly how the site works and what to expect – most likely via a memo and conference call for those who are available for one.

To access a power point presentation and video demonstration of the national free legal answers platform, please go to:….

If you have any questions at all, please feel free to contact me.




Kristen Wagner Esq.

Director, Pro Bono Services

New York State Bar Association

Albany NY

(518) 487-5640

The Showman – The New Yorker

 Jeffrey Toobin‘s May 9 article in The New Yorker, appropriately called, “The Showman,” about United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara’s infatuation with and misuse of the media.

Read more…long article.

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JURIST – When Prosecutors Parade, Criminal Justice Becomes a Circus

JURIST Guest Columnists Stephen Cooper and Donnie W. Bethel discuss the effect of the behavior of Prosecutors who parade their cases to the media has on the Criminal Justice system…


Prosecutors routinely call conferences to vet prosecution evidence under the glow of the media’s klieg lights–as occurred in the much-publicized Brendan Dassey and Steven Avery case in Netflix’s Making A Murderer–tainting the jury pool and infringing on Avery and Dassey’s constitutional right to a fair trial (as ably reported upon earlier this year in John Ferak’s column, “Legal experts blast Avery prosecutor’s conduct.“)

The same questionable litigation tactics, dressed up in federal garb, are on full display in Jeffrey Toobin’s May 9 article in The New Yorker, appropriately called, “The Showman,” about United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara‘s infatuation with and misuse of the media.


Read more here.

Email scam targets lawyers with fake disciplinary warnings, bar announcements–ABA Journal

Lawyers across the country should be on the lookout for phishing emails, which purport to be about new discipline investigations.More than 50 attorneys have received the emails, which have links to malicious software, says Molly Flood, research and information manager with the ABA’s Division for Bar Services. She suspects that senders get email addresses through the websites of state bars that also handle attorney regulation.


“They also dummied up a webpage, that looked like it was our website,” says Francine Walker, the Florida Bar’s director of public information. Besides using unpaid bar dues and discipline complaints as a ruse, some of the emails claimed that the bar changed its fee schedule.

Read entire report from ABA Journal here.

What Lawyers Should Know About Cloud Computing Security Standards – Legal Talk Network

What Lawyers Should Know About Cloud Computing Security Standards

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The large volume of data that many law firms handle makes utilizing cloud computing services a very enticing prospect. What ethical standards should lawyers expect these companies to abide by? What should lawyers look for in a cloud computing provider?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway speak with Clio founder and CEO Jack Newton and Rocket Matter founder and CEO Larry Port about cloud computing and the new cloud security standards for legal professionals released by the Legal Cloud Computing Association. Larry explains what the LCCA is and how it formed out of a need to educate lawyers about what is happening in the cloud. Jack provides some insight into the creation of the security standards, such as terms of service privacy policies and encryption, and states that with these standards as a baseline lawyers will be able to more easily assess if a cloud computing provider is adhering to certain ethical standards. Larry also lists a few factors lawyers should consider, like where the SaaS data center is located, and the four things (vulnerability scans, penetration testing, and aesthetic code and dynamic code reviews) that the standards require in security testing. They both end the interview with an analysis of in-transit and at rest encryption and the benefits and drawbacks of zero knowledge level security.


Read entire article here.

Schoenefeld v. State of New York

Full Text of Decision.

The court upheld N.Y. Judiciary Law § 470, requiring nonresident attorneys to maintain offices in New York State. Noting that more than 20,000 NYSBA members reside or practice outside the state, President David P. Miranda formed a working group to review the decision.

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