Barred From the Bar: The Winding Road From Prisoner to Lawyer – Big Law Business

By  – Bloomberg
***
As the U.S. prison population has surged over the decades, the legal profession’s distaste for former inmates has become more conspicuous.
***

Roughly 70 million people in the U.S. are estimated to have a criminal record of some kind, and nearly 700,000 are released from incarceration annually, according to the National Employment Law Project. More than 60 percent of formerly incarcerated people are unemployed a year after their release, according to the Sentencing Project, and those who do find work take home 40 percent a year less than those who haven’t served time.

Nationwide, 150 cities and counties have adopted laws that prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their criminal histories, as part of the “ban the box”movement.

***

Read more…

Related articles

Advertisements

Federal judge blocks Trump’s executive order on denying funding to sanctuary cities – The Washington Post

A federal judge issued an injunction to permanently block President Trump’s executive order to deny funding to cities that refused to cooperate with federal immigration officials, after finding the order unconstitutional.

The ruling by District Judge William H. Orrick in San Francisco comes in response to a lawsuit filed by the city of San Francisco and nearby Santa Clara County and follows a temporary halt on the order that the judge issued in April.

Orrick, in his summary of the case Monday, found that the Trump administration’s efforts to move local officials to cooperate with its efforts to deport undocumented immigrants violated the separation of powers doctrine as well as the Fifth and Tenth amendments.

***

Read more…

Related articles

Dementia Science and the Law | Live & Webcast

This timely program will address the fragility of the human brain and how and by whom capacity determinations are made for and/or on behalf of the millions of adult Americans who have diminished mental capacity, including the estimated five million Americans who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s diseases.  Special emphasis will be placed on the tensions between lawyers and healthcare professionals as to how, where, and by whom such capacity determinations should be made.

Sponsored by the Committee on Continuing Legal Education and Elder Law and Special Needs, Health Law and Senior Lawyers Sections

Thursday, December, 14, 2017

8:30 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.

Live CLE Program & Webcast

The Core Club
66 East 55th Street
New York, NY 10022

4.5 MCLE Credits | 3.5 Professional Practice | 1.0 Ethics

NYSBA Member Price: $135 | Non-member: $235

Co-Sponsoring Section Member: $110

www.nysba.org/DementiaCLE

——————————
Kathleen Plog
New York State Bar Association
kplog@nysba.org (518) 487-5681
Albany, NY

Trump Administration Orders Large-Scale Immigration Raids–for DUIs – Rewire

***
Since November 4, ICE has apprehended 25 undocumented immigrants in Long Island, New York, as part of the immigration enforcement sting “Operation Secure Streets.” Twenty-four were targeted because of a DUI-related conviction, according to ICE. “This operation targeted those who were convicted of driving under the influence, some with children in the car, solidifying ICE’s commitment to remove public safety threats from our communities,” said Thomas R. Decker, an ICE field office director.
 
***
 

Convicted former Subway pitchman has sovereign citizen approach rejected

***

A federal judge in Indianapolis has rejected a sovereign citizen argument made by convicted former Subway pitchman Jared Fogle.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt said Fogle’s pro se filing was frivolous and she was rejecting his “motion to correct clear error.” The Indiana Lawyer, the Indianapolis Star and the Washington Post have stories on Pratt’s Nov. 8 order(PDF).

***

Women Lawyers: Slowly Chipping Away At The Glass Ceiling | Above the Law

By 

***

Employment discrimination and sexual harassment allegations have been making headlines for weeks now, and it’s about time. These are systemic issues that need to be addressed, a task that is far easier said than done. But the recent slew of allegations are just a start. Shedding light on the pervasiveness of the problem is the first step toward eradicating it.

Not surprisingly, the legal profession is not immune from gender discrimination and women lawyers often encounter it on the job. That women lawyers encounter discrimination is not surprising to me and shouldn’t be to anyone else. Nearly every woman attorney I’ve spoken to has faced gender discrimination at various stages of her legal career.

What is surprising, however, is the spate of class-action lawsuits alleging gender discrimination that have been filed against large law firms in recent years. After learning of the latest lawsuit, I wondered: why now?

***

Read more…

Related articles

A New Phone Comes Out. Yours Slows Down. A Conspiracy? No. – The New York Times

***

The phenomenon of perceived slowdowns is so widespread that many believe tech companies intentionally cripple smartphones and computers to ensure that people buy new ones every few years. Conspiracy theorists call it planned obsolescence.

That’s a myth. While slowdowns happen, they take place for a far less nefarious reason. That reason is a software upgrade.

***

Read more…

Related articles

%d bloggers like this: