New CBP Border Device Search Policy Still Permits Unconstitutional Searches | Electronic Frontier Foundation

JANUARY 8, 2018

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a new policy on border searches of electronic devices that’s full of loopholes and vague language and that continues to allow agents to violate travelers’ constitutional rights. Although the new policy contains a few improvements over rules first published nine years ago, overall it doesn’t go nearly far enough to protect the privacy of innocent travelers or to recognize how exceptionally intrusive electronic device searches are.

Nothing announced in the policy changes the fact that these device searches are unconstitutional, and EFF will continue to fight for travelers’ rights in our border search lawsuit.

Below is a legal analysis of some of the key features of the new policy.

Read analysis….

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Washington state attorney general sues Motel 6 for handing over customer data to immigration agents

Updated: Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson is suing Motel 6 “for voluntarily providing guest lists to agents of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement,” on a routine basis for at least two years, which led to the detention of at least six people presumed to be in the country illegally, according to a press release issued Wednesday.

The suit, filed in King County Superior Court, states that at least six Motel 6 locations statewide released client information, including names, driver’s license numbers, room numbers, dates of birth and license plate numbers, affecting at least 9,000 guests.

Motel 6 leaves the light on for ICE…
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Erie County clerk rolls out program to alert communities to foreclosures – The Buffalo News

Courtesy of:
Harry G. Meyer, Esq.
Docent and Lecturer
Western New York History and Architecture
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Erie County Clerk Michael P. Kearns has come up with a new initiative to combat two of the biggest problems that contribute to “zombie homes” — homes that have been abandoned by owners during the lengthy foreclosure process but have not been been taken over by banks.

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Kearns’ program will enable cities, towns and villages to have direct access to Erie County Clerk’s Office databases showing all new foreclosure actions in their communities since the start of January.

The information will not only include property addresses, but the name of the bank foreclosing on the property, and the name of the lawyer handling the legal process. That information will allow communities to take action early to keep properties from turning into “zombies,” he said.

“This is not being done anywhere else in New York State,” he said.

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Read more…

NYSBA Pro Bono Portal – Empowering New York attorneys to get matched with rewarding pro bono opportunities and to learn new skills.

Following several Executive Orders announcing travel bans and increased immigration enforcement, the legal community has increased its efforts to deliver vital immigration legal services to our communities and thousands of attorneys have volunteered to donate their time and services on a pro bono basis. The New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) received many inquiries from its members about how they can help.  In order to best address the rise of attorneys seeking to do pro bono work, while supporting the non-profit and legal service organizations actively serving New York’s immigrant communities, NYSBA paired up with the New York Bar Foundation and Legal.io to create a web-based portal through which attorneys can be referred to volunteer opportunities in a tailored and timely fashion.

NYSBA’s Immigration Pro Bono Portal provides volunteer attorneys with tailored referrals to current and relevant volunteer opportunities at legal services organizations where the attorneys’ specific skills and experience are needed. As a result, attorneys are connected with appropriate volunteer opportunities in a timely manner while legal services organizations are able to provide more services and save valuable resources.

Since July, we have referred over fifty attorneys to more than twenty organizations across the state. In the long run, we seek to assist New York’s civil legal service community in achieving 100% legal immigration representation (currently the nationwide average is about 30%), where representation in deportation and detention contexts is the norm, not an exception.

We encourage attorneys who are interested in volunteering to visit www.nysbaprobono.org and register as a volunteer attorney so that we may provide them with tailored referrals to volunteer opportunities for which they may be well suited. We also encourage organizations across the state that both serve New York’s immigrant population, and have a need for pro bono volunteers, to visit the site and create a listing, indicating their volunteer needs, so we may refer suitable volunteers to them. If you have any questions about NYSBA’s Pro Bono Immigration Portal, please email me at probonoportal@nysba.org or call me at 518-487-5642.

Best Regards,

Yuriy Pereyaslavskiy,

Immigration Pro Bono Fellow

NY Federal Judge Tosses Emoluments Suit Against Trump for Lack of Standing | New York Law Journal

By Andrew Denney

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A federal judge has tossed out a suit against President Donald Trump alleging that his vast network of businesses are creating conflicts prohibited by the emoluments clauses of the U.S. Constitution, finding that the plaintiffs lack standing.

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Read more…

Read the Michael Flynn Plea Agreement, Statement of Offense | Law.com

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Regulation and the Local Food Movement | The Regulatory Review

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The local food movement has been booming over the last several years. The number of farmers’ markets across the country has nearly doubled in the last decade, and a recent Pew Research Center poll found that a majority of people in the United States had bought locally grown produce in the previous month. The enormous interest in eating locally has even led to the coinage of a new word: locavore.

Local food production and consumption offer a variety of benefits, which two legal scholars, Patricia Salkin and Amy Lavine, discuss in a recent paper. Because of these purported benefits, Salkin and Lavine argue that local and state governments should follow the example of some of their peers and update their zoning and land use regulations to encourage more local food production.

Salkin and Lavine tout the advantages of “foodsheds”–geographic areas surrounding urban areas that can provide some of the food that city-dwellers consume. For instance, Salkin and Lavine point to potential environmental benefits: Small farms may use fewer chemicals and produce less waste than large industrial farms. And it requires much less fuel to transport produce to a nearby city than it does to transport produce across the country.

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Read more…