The Apple Product Cheat Sheet for Lawyers – Legal Talk Network

68-73% of lawyers use iPhones and those aren’t the only Apple products pervading the legal industry. The use of iPads for law has also become more and more common. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Brett Burney about the latest Apple products and how they can serve lawyers. From face ID to the benefits of iOS 11, they share which Apple tools will save lawyers time and effort in their business. They also discuss the top apps that attorneys who use Apple products should download. Check out links to those apps below.

Brett Burney is Principal of Burney Consultants LLC and is active in the Mac-using lawyer community, working with lawyers who want to integrate Macs, iPhones, and iPads into their practice.

Mentioned in This Episode
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Home Screens – MacSparky’s Strange Looking iPad — MacSparky

David Sparks:
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About halfway through the iOS 11 beta, I got the idea of putting all my apps on the dock. It started out as a sort-of joke so I could share screenshots of my iPad looking more like a Mac. The thing is though … it worked for me. So now my home screen is empty and my dock has a few essentials, but also my Make, Learn, Fix, and Play folders. Opening the folder to get to a split screen app feels silly but is still way faster than getting to an app on the home screen.
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How to manually offload and reinstall apps in iOS 11 | Cult of Mac

iOS 11 can automatically delete apps when space gets tight on your iPhone or iPad. It’s called offloading, and only the app itself gets removed.

All the app’s data is saved. That way, if you reinstall the app in the future, it will be like you never deleted it. Wouldn’t it be great if you could choose to offload apps yourself, instead of deleting them? Well, good news, because you can totally do that. Here’s how….
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Paralegal robot reviews patent documents

BY STEPHEN RYNKIEWICZ–ABA Journal
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TurboPatent Corp. on June 28 launched artificial-intelligence products that compare patent claims with past applications to make predictions about patent eligibility.
The patent drafting software, dubbed RoboReview, automates paralegal work, bringing more rigor to the task of researching prior art and potentially saving thousands of dollars on a filing. It’s sold as a subscription product on an unlimited or per-use basis.

“Typically this review is done by humans doing multiple searches,” says James Billmaier, TurboPatent’s chief executive officer. “Very seasoned attorneys are amazed at things the machine finds that they miss in these very technically written documents.”

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Read more…

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Adobe to kill off Flash by 2020 | TheHill

BY JOE UCHILL

Adobe announced it would end support for the multimedia plug-in Flash by the end of 2020.

“Adobe is planning to end-of-life Flash. Specifically, we will stop updating and distributing the Flash Player at the end of 2020 and encourage content creators to migrate any existing Flash content to these new open formats,” the company wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

Read More…

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A New Kind of Instant Messaging

Whether it’s corporations or governments, digital surveillance today is widespread. Toxis easy-to-use software that connects you with friends and family without anyone else listening in. While other big-name services require you to pay for features, Tox is completely free and comes without advertising — forever.
Everything you do with Tox is encrypted using open-source libraries. The only people who can see your conversations are the people you’re talking with.

Life hack: how to best arrange your iPhone apps, one icon at a time | Technology | The Guardian

In the 10 years since the iPhone launched, I’ve never really settled on a way to arrange my home screen that I actually like. Folders seem clunky but no folders leaves me with too many things multiple swipes away. Organising by what I use most leaves me with the rarely but rapidly needed apps buried, while organising by speed of access leaves me tapping through multiple times a day.

And then there’s aesthetics. Some apps simply don’t deserve to be on my first home screen no matter how much I use them. Mostly games. Game designers can’t make an attractive icon for the life of them, it seems.

I was trapped on the horns of dilemma. So for the past couple of years, I’ve abdicated all responsibility for the decision making, and instead instituted A System: every time I tap on an app to open it, I move it one square closer to the front.

Read more….

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