Your Gmail account is fair game for cops or feds, says US judge| Naked Security

Case 1:14-mj-00309-UA (SDNY) by Leonard E Sienko Jr

Besides the decision itself, which concerns a money-laundering investigation, New York District Judge Gabriel Gorenstein’s decision was unusual in that the he actually took the trouble to write a lengthy explanation.Southern District NY  “… on Thursday opened up our entire Gmail accounts to feds or cops with warrants, in spite of two recent decisions that went against similar requests.

He wrote that email accounts are the same as hard drives, as far as the law was concerned, meaning they can be seized in their entirety when investigators show up with a warrant…”

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Read entire analysis by Naked Security here.

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Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited Service Is Now Official | Ubergizmo

 

By Tyler Lee

A few days ago, it was reported that Amazon was planning on introducing an unlimited Kindle service. Basically it involves users subscribing to the Kindle Unlimited service at $9.99 a month and gain access to pretty much the entire Kindle library at Amazon. Sounds like a good deal, right?

Well if you’re an avid reader and you think that you will be able to make your money worthwhile, you might be pleased to learn that Amazon has officially launched the Kindle Unlimited service. The information seems to the same as what we saw the other day, which was pretty much Amazon announcing it ahead of it.

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Read Tyler Lee’s complete post here.

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EDITOR’S NOTE:  Kindle Unlimited has its own “Free” buttons on Amazon; i.e., when you find a book you want, be careful to choose the Kindle Unlimited

Free”  button–not the “One-Click” or other buttons.  If you use “One-Click”, you will be charged and have to figure out how to cancel the order.

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Hacking Chaos: The Cornell Method of Note-Taking–Lisa Needham for Lawyerist

 

by Lisa Needham 

Taking notes by hand is better than typing notes, because it forces you to slow down and focus on what is important. Slowing down greatly increases your understanding of information, which is why you need to become better at note-taking.

That’s where the Cornell Method comes in. The Cornell Method has you separate your notes into note-taking portion, key points, and a summary. And it is ideal for lawyers.1

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If you’ve wondered why you take notes as you do at trial and have forgotten where you came up with the form you use, read the entire article, complete with illustrations.

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Model Legal Documents–NVCA Model Venture Capital Financing Documents

 

A “template” set of model legal documents for venture capital investments put together by a group of leading venture capital attorneys. The model venture capital financing documents consist of:

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Who Will “own” These Documents?

No one will own the documents. They will be in the public domain. However, the “mother” forms are posted here on the publicly accessible portion of the NVCA web site so that users downloading them from this site can be assured that they are always using the most current and up-to-date version.

 DISCLAIMER: EACH DOCUMENT IS INTENDED TO SERVE AS A STARTING POINT ONLY, AND SHOULD BE TAILORED TO MEET YOUR SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS. THE DOCUMENTS SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED AS LEGAL ADVICE FOR ANY PARTICULAR FACTS OR CIRCUMSTANCES.

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Read entire NVCA article with rationale for model documents here.

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Application for New York State Education Department Certification as a Special Education Impartial Hearing Officer: Special Education : P-12 : NYSED

 

The New York State Education Department is seeking applications from individuals to serve as impartial hearing officers (IHOs) to conduct special education impartial due process hearings for students with disabilities, 3-21 years of age pursuant to section 200.1(x) of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education. Interested individuals should submit a letter of interest, completed application and resume no later than July 30, 2014. For more information, please see http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/dueprocess/IHOannounce.htm. Please share as appropriate. Thank you.

New York State Education Department

P-12: Office of Special Education

89 Washington Avenue, Room 309 EB

Albany, NY 12234

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Today’s Tech: How A California Personal Injury Attorney Uses Google Glass -Niki Black

From:  « Above the Law: A Legal Web Site – News, Commentary, and Opinions on Law Firms, Lawyers, Law Schools, Law Suits, Judges and Courts + Career Resources

 

 Meet Mitch Jackson, a California personal injury attorney, and learn how he uses the wearable technology Google Glass in his law firm.

 

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It turns out, Mitch is realistic about the limitations of Google Glass in its present state. Even so, he believes that investing time into learning how to use it now it will pay off. “I see it as a short- and long-term play. How practical is it in the practice of catastrophic injury and death cases? It’s not quite there yet,” he admits. “Of course I could do some — but not all — of the things I use Glass for using my smartphone. But wearable mobile technology is the future, in my opinion. So that’s why I’m using it now — to get comfortable with it. I want to be at the forefront of where the technology is going. That way I’ll understand how it needs to improve and how I can use it in my practice to improve the client experience and give me an edge over my competitors. That’s why I’m incorporating Google Glass into my workflow as much as I can.”

Despite the newness of Google Glass, Mitch is implementing it into his law practice as much as possible and hopes to use it during trial in the near future. “I’ve used it to record interviews of witnesses and during depositions to videotape the proceeding so that my client can watch it later,” he says. “And, I was planning to use Glass earlier this year in two jury trials, with the consent of the judge and opposing counsel, but both cases settled. I must admit that although I’m glad we were able to resolve the cases, I was a bit disappointed in not having the opportunity to use Glass during trial.”

When I asked how Mitch expects to use Google Glass during trial, he replied: “In the near future, and subject to court approval, I hope to use Glass to pick my juries and examine witnesses. For example, I anticipate picking a jury here in California and use Glass to confidentially interact in real time with my jury consultant back in New York. Based upon the responses and body language she observes from the real-time feed, she can share follow-up questions and concerns via my ear bud. Information and issues she finds in her database searches that I need to know about will be discreetly displayed to my Google Glass screen.”

Another way that he uses Google Glass is to communicate with clients. “I use Google Glass to stay connected with my clients and stay on top of my calendar and social media. Each new client is added to my Glass contact list and throughout the course of the day I can easily monitor and respond to inquiries regardless of where I am or what I’m doing,” he explains. “For example, I’ll use the camera function of Google Glass to share real-time images and videos with clients while working on pleadings or taking the deposition of a witnesses. They enjoy getting an update with me holding up a finished pleading or settlement check and tell me that they appreciate the extra effort and prompt service.”

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Read Niki’s entire article about Mitch’s use of Google Glass here.

 

 

 

 

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Lawyers may look at what jurors post online, but only if it’s available to the public-ABA Journal

 

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The gist of Formal Opinion 466 is that, within the context of Model Rule 3.5, a lawyer may review a juror’s or potential juror’s various postings on websites and social media. But the lawyer should not send jurors or prospective jurors a request for access, either directly or indirectly, to their social media accounts because doing so would amount to a violation of the prohibition in Model Rule 3.5(b) against ex parte communications with jurors that are not authorized by law or court order.

In a footnote, the ethics committee states that it “does not take a position on whether the standard of care for competent lawyer performance requires using Internet research to locate information about jurors that is relevant to the jury selection process. We are also mindful of the recent addition of Comment [8] to Model Rule 1.1. This comment explains that a lawyer ‘should keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology.’ “

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The ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility Formal Opinion 466(PDF), issued April 24.

Read entire ABA Journal article here.

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