Pro Bono Requirement Modified to Help LL.M. Students-NYLJ

Joel Stashenko:

ALBANY – Responding to concerns voiced by law school deans, New York will give foreign master of law degree students more time to meet the requirement that new lawyers perform 50 hours of pro bono service before being admitted to the bar.

The Advisory Committee on New York State Pro Bono Bar Admission Requirements has decided that the previous interpretation of the state pro bono rules giving LL.M. students as little as a year to fulfill the 50-hour requirement was too limited.

Under an updated guide to the new rules released on Aug. 26, the committee said pro bono work performed by foreign students one year before they begin their course of study will count toward meeting the 50-hour obligation for entry to the New York bar.

Read more: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/PubArticleNY.jsp?id=1202619280542&Pro_Bono_Requirement_Modified_to_Help_LLM_Students#ixzz2fMZLXnG1

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The Reality of Low-Bono Law Practice-Sam Glover on Lawyerist

Sam Glover:  There are plenty of people who need a lawyer but can’t afford one at the going rates. In theory, that leaves a huge market of under-served legal consumers. And there seem to be plenty of idealistic new and out-of-work lawyers who see that as an opportunity to build a “low-bono” practice.

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As they put it, if you have a lot of experience and skills when you start a low-bono practice, “you are going to be poor for a very long time.” Low-bono law practice is not about idealism, they say, it is a slog. If you aren’t realistic, it won’t work.

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NYSBA Pro Bono Appeals Program

The New York State Bar Association is proud to provide an innovative Pro Bono Appeals Program that offers free representation to individuals of modest means in selected appeals to the Appellate Division in both the Third and Fourth Departments.

The Program, which began in the Third Department three years ago, was recently expanded to the Fourth Department. Family law appeals have proven to be the area of greatest need. The Program also offers appellate representation in cases involving education, health, housing, unemployment insurance, and worker’s compensation. The Association’s Committee on Courts of Appellate Jurisdiction selects cases based on several factors, including the merits of the issues raised and the potential impact of the case.

If you have clients of modest means who could benefit from this Program, please tell them about it and help them complete an application, available at www.nysba.org/probonoappeals, along with other details about the Program. Applicants with income up to 250% of Federal Poverty Guidelines are eligible for representation. Also, if you have appellate experience and would like to participate in the program, please contact the Program at info@probonoappealsny.org.

Sincerely,

Seymour W. James, Jr., President

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Chief Judge Puts Pro Bono Disclosure Requirement in Place–NYLJ

ALBANY – Beginning today, New York lawyers must disclose on their biennial registration forms how many pro bono hours they provided and how much they made in financial donations to pro bono programs during the previous two years.

The new reporting requirements of Part 118 and Rule 6.1 of the Rules of Professional Conduct were approved by Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman and the presiding justices of the Appellate Division’s four departments on April 23.

Lippman’s “Task Force to Expand Access to Civil Legal Services” recommended increasing the voluntary pro bono goal for lawyers in the state to 50 hours a year from 20 (NYLJ, Dec. 7, 2012). That proposal is also being implemented today.

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Lippman Unveils Rule Detailing Bar Admission Pro Bono Mandate- NYLJ

Read entire NYLJ report by Joel Stashenko & Christine Simmons

Details of the new 50-hour pro bono requirement for applicants to the New York bar were unveiled yesterday by Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman.

Specifics of the program announced in May were eagerly awaited by law schools, public interest groups, bar associations and other members of the bar. They were announced by Lippman at a press conference at New York University School of Law.

The first-in-the-nation requirement will take effect immediately for first- and second-year law students, who will have up to 34 months to fulfill the mandate. Current third-years are exempt.

Read the new rule on pro bono practice.

 

 

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