Lawyers must inform current clients when they make material errors, ABA ethics opinion says–ABA Journal

BY DAVID HUDSON

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However, the opinion also says that lawyers do not have to inform former clients of such material errors.

Formal Ethics Opinion No. 481 explains that this duty is rooted in ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 1.4, which governs a lawyer’s duty of communication. That rule requires lawyers to promptly inform clients of any decision or circumstance for which a client’s informed consent is needed. It also requires a lawyer to “reasonably consult” with the client about the means of achieving the client’s goals during representation and keeping the client “reasonably informed” about the progression of the case.

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Want To See How The NYPD Disciplines Its Employees? Search For Yourself.–BuzzFeed News

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Today BuzzFeed News is making public one of the New York Police Department’s most fiercely guarded secrets: a database of disciplinary findings for about 1,800 NYPD employees who faced departmental misconduct charges between 2011 and 2015.

This information has been closely guarded for years, and completely off-limits since 2016, when the NYPD removed them from public view, citing a controversial state law that shields police officers’ misconduct. As a result, New Yorkers who are charged with a crime have no simple way to find out if the officer who arrested them has a misconduct record that might affect their credibility with a jury. Officers who have faced disciplinary charges have limited information about how their punishment compares with those of other officers in similar situations. And taxpayers as a whole have no way to assess how their police department is policing its own.

Many other large departments, in states such as Illinois and Florida, routinely make this information available. “The public has a right to know what our public officials are doing, and this is especially true with our police officers, who have the power to shoot to kill, use force, and deprive people of their liberty through stop or arrest,” said Samuel Walker, a national policing expert.

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