Future Now Certain for Oyez SCOTUS Archive; Finds New Home at Cornell’s LII – Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites

In 1996, Jerry Goldman, then a professor at Northwestern University, assembled a few dozen recordings of Supreme Court arguments and made them available through a website originally called The Oyez Project. Today Oyez, as it is now known, has grown to become the authoritative source for all of the Supreme Court’s audio since the court first installed a recording system in 1955, as well as an extensive archive of related resources. But with Goldman retiring this month from Chicago-Kent College of Law, where Oyez is now run, the site’s future was in question.

That question has now been answered as the Legal Information Institute at Cornell University Law School, the legal resource site Justia, and Oyez announced that Oyez will move to the LII as its new home, with infrastructure and technical support from Justia, which had already been quietly supporting the Oyez site for several years.

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What Lawyers Should Know About Cloud Computing Security Standards – Legal Talk Network

What Lawyers Should Know About Cloud Computing Security Standards

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The large volume of data that many law firms handle makes utilizing cloud computing services a very enticing prospect. What ethical standards should lawyers expect these companies to abide by? What should lawyers look for in a cloud computing provider?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway speak with Clio founder and CEO Jack Newton and Rocket Matter founder and CEO Larry Port about cloud computing and the new cloud security standards for legal professionals released by the Legal Cloud Computing Association. Larry explains what the LCCA is and how it formed out of a need to educate lawyers about what is happening in the cloud. Jack provides some insight into the creation of the security standards, such as terms of service privacy policies and encryption, and states that with these standards as a baseline lawyers will be able to more easily assess if a cloud computing provider is adhering to certain ethical standards. Larry also lists a few factors lawyers should consider, like where the SaaS data center is located, and the four things (vulnerability scans, penetration testing, and aesthetic code and dynamic code reviews) that the standards require in security testing. They both end the interview with an analysis of in-transit and at rest encryption and the benefits and drawbacks of zero knowledge level security.

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