Thinking about buying a new iPhone? Read this first. – The Washington Post

Apple’s begun taking preorders for the new iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, and by all accounts, it looks like another record launch. A lot has happened in the wireless industry since the last time Apple released a new iPhone: All four national cellular carriers — AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint — have moved away from the traditional two-year contract, that familiar arrangement that tied you to your carrier but let you buy a basic iPhone at a subsidized price of $199.

This shift away from device subsidies means millions of Americans for the first time will be expected to cover the full price of their phones — $649 or more, in the case of the iPhone. But the range of choices is more likely to confuse than to clarify. You can buy. You can lease. Some offer promotional pricing; others don’t. You can pay for the phone in installments. But how many? Twelve? Eighteen? Twenty-four? Thirty?

Into this mix comes Apple, which just announced a new plan of its own that lets you pay for an iPhone over 24 months and upgrade every 12 months.

For reasons we’ll get into below, we think Apple’s new iPhone upgrade plan will be right for many people, and it could even reshape the face of the cellular industry. But it’s not for everyone. In fact, even though it’s aimed at simplifying everything, the addition of a new choice from Apple threatens to add complexity to an already confusing jumble of payment plans.

Choice give you flexibility. But it also adds complexity, which is why we’ve tried to narrow down the options based on four common consumer archetypes. iPhone shoppers should ask themselves what they value most: Is it price? Is it the ability to upgrade the device whenever you want? Do you want to own the device? Or do you just like the way things were?

Check out the detailed analysis by the Washington Post of your choices for buying a new iPhone.

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That TSA-approved lock on your suitcase just got hacked | Computerworld

It’s a basic fact of life that once you publish something on the Internet, it’s pretty much impossible to get it back. Now illustrating that point with painful clarity, images of the TSA‘s master luggage keys have been published online, meaning that anyone with a 3D printer can make their own.

More detail from Computerworld here.

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For Research, Lawyers Turn First to Free Sources, ABA Survey Says – Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites

Lawyers spend an average of 20 percent of their work time conducting legal research, and when they start a research project, they generally turn first to free online research services before using fee-based services or research materials in print or on CD-ROM.

However, with respect to online research exclusively (excluding books and CD-ROMs), lawyers are more likely to start a research project using a fee-based service than a free one. Thirty-eight percent of lawyers say they go first to a fee-based resource, while 37 percent say they start with a general search engine such as Google or Bing. Fourteen percent say they start with a bar-sponsored research service such as Fastcase or Casemaker.

These are among the findings reported in the 2015 edition of the annual Legal Technology Survey Report, compiled by the American Bar Association’s Legal Technology Resource Center. These findings are from Volume 5 of the report, covering online research.

As always, Bob has much more detail, if you click through to his complete post.