Cyberlaw Clinic | Berkman Center

Cyberlaw Clinic 

The Cyberlaw Clinic provides high-quality, pro-bono legal services to appropriate individuals, small start-ups, non-profit groups and government entities regarding cutting-edge issues of the Internet, new technology and intellectual property. Harvard Law School students enhance their preparation for high-tech practice and earn course credit for working on a variety of real-world litigation, client counseling, advocacy, legislation, and transactional/licensing projects and cases.

The Berkman Center‘s Interactive collection features conversations with and talks by leading cyber-scholars, entrepreneurs, activists, and policymakers as they explore topics such as: the factors that influence knowledge creation and dissemination in the digital age; the character of power as the worlds of governance, business, citizenship, and the media meet the Internet; and the opportunities, role, and limitations of new technologies in learning.

All Berkman events, including conferences, luncheon series talks, and most meetings, are webcast then archived here, along with unique productions like the Citizen Media Law Project podcast and episodes of Berkman.tv. A selection of the archive is also available on Berkman’s YouTube channel.

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“Link Rot” and Legal Resources on the Web: A 2011 Analysis by the Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group | LLRX.com

The Chesapeake Digital Preservation Group has completed its fourth annual investigation of link rot among the original URLs for online law and policy-related materials archived though the group’s efforts.

Originally launched as a Web-preservation pilot project in 2007, the Chesapeake Group is today part of the Legal Information Archive. Group participants include two academic law libraries, the Georgetown Law and Harvard Law School Libraries, and the State Law Libraries of Maryland and Virginia.

The Chesapeake Group focuses primarily on the preservation of Web-published legal materials, which often disappear as Web site content is rearranged or deleted over time. In the four years since the program began, the Chesapeake Group has built a digital archive collection comprising more than 7,400 digital items and 3,200 titles, all of which were originally posted to the Web.

For this study, the term “link rot” is used to describe a URL that no longer provides direct access to files matching the content originally harvested from the URL and currently preserved in the Chesapeake Group’s digital archive. In some instances, a 404 or “not found” message indicates link rot at a URL. In other cases, the URL may direct to a site hosted by the original publishing organization or entity, but the specific resource has been removed or relocated from the original or previous URL.

All of the Web resources described in this report that have disappeared from their original locations on the Web remain accessible via permanent archive URLs here at legalinfoarchive.org, thanks to the Chesapeake Group’s efforts.

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