Early impressions: Amazon Fire Phone–Gizmag

 

By Will Shanklin

Apple launched the iPhone seven years ago. The first flagship Android phones hit the scene four and a half years ago. Hell, even Windows Phone has been around for over three years. But now Amazon is launching its first smartphone in mid-2014. Though we aren’t yet ready to publish our full review, we have the Amazon Fire Phone in house and have some early thoughts.

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So how does Amazon try to differentiate its flagship smartphone when it’s this late in the game? Well, the answer appears to be with gimmicks.

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Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited Service Is Now Official | Ubergizmo

 

By Tyler Lee

A few days ago, it was reported that Amazon was planning on introducing an unlimited Kindle service. Basically it involves users subscribing to the Kindle Unlimited service at $9.99 a month and gain access to pretty much the entire Kindle library at Amazon. Sounds like a good deal, right?

Well if you’re an avid reader and you think that you will be able to make your money worthwhile, you might be pleased to learn that Amazon has officially launched the Kindle Unlimited service. The information seems to the same as what we saw the other day, which was pretty much Amazon announcing it ahead of it.

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Read Tyler Lee’s complete post here.

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EDITOR’S NOTE:  Kindle Unlimited has its own “Free” buttons on Amazon; i.e., when you find a book you want, be careful to choose the Kindle Unlimited

Free”  button–not the “One-Click” or other buttons.  If you use “One-Click”, you will be charged and have to figure out how to cancel the order.

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Today’s Tech: How A California Personal Injury Attorney Uses Google Glass -Niki Black

From:  « Above the Law: A Legal Web Site – News, Commentary, and Opinions on Law Firms, Lawyers, Law Schools, Law Suits, Judges and Courts + Career Resources

 

 Meet Mitch Jackson, a California personal injury attorney, and learn how he uses the wearable technology Google Glass in his law firm.

 

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It turns out, Mitch is realistic about the limitations of Google Glass in its present state. Even so, he believes that investing time into learning how to use it now it will pay off. “I see it as a short- and long-term play. How practical is it in the practice of catastrophic injury and death cases? It’s not quite there yet,” he admits. “Of course I could do some — but not all — of the things I use Glass for using my smartphone. But wearable mobile technology is the future, in my opinion. So that’s why I’m using it now — to get comfortable with it. I want to be at the forefront of where the technology is going. That way I’ll understand how it needs to improve and how I can use it in my practice to improve the client experience and give me an edge over my competitors. That’s why I’m incorporating Google Glass into my workflow as much as I can.”

Despite the newness of Google Glass, Mitch is implementing it into his law practice as much as possible and hopes to use it during trial in the near future. “I’ve used it to record interviews of witnesses and during depositions to videotape the proceeding so that my client can watch it later,” he says. “And, I was planning to use Glass earlier this year in two jury trials, with the consent of the judge and opposing counsel, but both cases settled. I must admit that although I’m glad we were able to resolve the cases, I was a bit disappointed in not having the opportunity to use Glass during trial.”

When I asked how Mitch expects to use Google Glass during trial, he replied: “In the near future, and subject to court approval, I hope to use Glass to pick my juries and examine witnesses. For example, I anticipate picking a jury here in California and use Glass to confidentially interact in real time with my jury consultant back in New York. Based upon the responses and body language she observes from the real-time feed, she can share follow-up questions and concerns via my ear bud. Information and issues she finds in her database searches that I need to know about will be discreetly displayed to my Google Glass screen.”

Another way that he uses Google Glass is to communicate with clients. “I use Google Glass to stay connected with my clients and stay on top of my calendar and social media. Each new client is added to my Glass contact list and throughout the course of the day I can easily monitor and respond to inquiries regardless of where I am or what I’m doing,” he explains. “For example, I’ll use the camera function of Google Glass to share real-time images and videos with clients while working on pleadings or taking the deposition of a witnesses. They enjoy getting an update with me holding up a finished pleading or settlement check and tell me that they appreciate the extra effort and prompt service.”

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Read Niki’s entire article about Mitch’s use of Google Glass here.

 

 

 

 

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2 Arrested For Flying Drone Close To New York Police Chopper–Ubergizmo

 

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While the Federal Aviation Administration has until next year to come up with rules that govern the use of drones in the National Airspace System there’s no denying the fact that drones have already taken to the skies. Available for a couple of hundred dollars, with models offering better altitude and range costing thousands, its fairly easy for anyone to get their hands on a drone.

This means that inevitably there would be a situation where someone lands in trouble even when they think they aren’t doing anything wrong. That’s exactly what happened to Wilkins Mendoza and Remy Castro who were arrested for flying a DJI Phantom 2 drone too close to a New York Police helicopter.

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Read entire Ubergizmo report here.

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iPhone Photos Backup: Effective & Simple Options | Ubergizmo

 

Ubergizmo:  A few years back we noted that the iPhone 4 was Flickr’s most popular camera, but as we’re writing this article the iPhone 5 has since claimed that crown, and the 5S is on track to claim top spot. With the popularity of the iPhone as portable camera, it’s important that you know how to backup your photos from your iPhone.

This guide is written based on iOS 7, Mac OS X 10.9.3 (Mavericks), and Windows 7, but it will work for older versions of OS X, along with Windows XP and Windows 8.

It’s important to understand where you’re planning to store your photo backups, but you’ll generally backup to at least one of the locations below:

  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Cloud service (e.g. iCloud, Dropbox, Google+, OneDrive etc)

There are pros and cons to each method, so do read on and hopefully by the time you’ve finished reading this guide, you’ll be able to decide which method is the most suitable one for you to backup your photos with.

Read entire “how-to” article, with screen shots, here.

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Google Glass enters open beta, goes on sale to anyone in the US | Ars Technica

Text-to-911: What you need to know (FAQ) – CNET

 

Beginning May 15, wireless carriers in the US will uniformly and voluntarily support Text-to-911, a program that lets you send text messages to emergency services as an alternative to placing a phone call.

While carriers will climb on board, this just means they’re making the service available — the ability to text the police in an emergency situation won’t work everywhere in the country the second May 15 rolls around. On the flipside, some counties have already embraced the program, usually working with a single carrier. Here are some important things to know about texting 911.

What is Text-to-911 and how does it work?
Text-to-911 is a free program for sending a text message addressed to “911” instead of placing a phone call. To use it, you address the message to 911 and enter the emergency in the body of the text, making sure that you also add your exact location — or else emergency services won’t be able to dispatch help your way.

Since it’s all SMS-based, you will hear a response for more follow-up questions, or when help is on the way.

Read entire CNET FAQ’s.

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Review: Monster Outlets To Go Power Strip — compact power strip with four outlets – iPhone J.D.

 

Jeff Richardson:  I often have trouble finding enough outlets when I travel.  Hotel rooms will frustratingly only provide a single wall outlet near a desk, with one of the two outlets already occupied by the desk lamp.  It is starting to become easier to find power outlets in airports, but you can still often find only a single outlet available for your use.  One solution is to use a power strip, but those are typically too large to take with you with you travel.  The Outlets To Go Power Strip from Monster seeks to provide a solution for travelers, and after seeing Tampa attorney Katie Floyd call it her favorite travel accessory, I purchased one from Amazon before I headed to Chicago for ABA TECHSHOW last month.  I have since used it on several business trips.  It has worked well for me and I can recommend it.

The device features two outlets on each side that are spaced far enough apart that you should not have a problem with even larger power adapters.  If you are plugging in three of four devices at once it can be a little awkward to have things plugged in on both sides, but it works, and designing the power strip this way keeps it as small as possible.

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Read Jeff’s entire review of this useful accessory, with photos.

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Click here to get Outlets To Go Power Strip from Amazon ($9.49).

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Tech-savvy criminals now using heat-seeking drones to target cannabis farms (From Halesowen News)

 

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One tech-savvy criminal said: “I bought my first drone for a few hundred quid and learnt how to fly it over wasteland and fitted a wifi camera to it so I could look into people’s windows.

“However, I noticed police helicopters used thermal imaging cameras to find cannabis farms because of the heat the hydroponic lights give off so I bought a second hand heat-seeking camera online and hooked it up to my Ipad.”

After finding a property containing a cannabis farm the criminal and “his crew” either burgle or blatantly “tax” the victim.

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Sandwell MP Tom Watson is the chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Drones.

He said: “This is remarkable story shows the proliferation of drone technology which can be used for both good and bad.

“It is no surprise enterprising criminals would want to get the upper hand in the criminal underworld by using drones.

He added: “As a society we will be dealing with the impact of drones on our laws and regulations for years to come.”

“And it is time the Government started listening about privacy concerns about the misuse of drones.”

Read entire report here.

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6 Legal Technologies That Should Be Obsolete-Lawyerist

Sam Glover:   Legal innovation is a popular topic this month, but it’s worth noting that most law offices are still weighed down by obsolete technology — or technology that ought to be obsolete, at least. Sure, we don’t use quills or mimeographs anymore, but there is a pretty good chance you still have a fax machine taking up space in your office.

Here are 5 legal technologies you can — and should — get rid of, and what to use instead.

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