Sony Digital E-Ink Tablet

 

The Sony Digital Paper E-Ink Tablet is Now Availabe From Sony Directly.

SONY:

Yellow pads, loose papers, and file folders are a thing of the past. Sony’s handheld letter-size Digital Paper lets you easily and securely access files, make and upload handwritten notes and annotated documents, save the files or archive for sharing with clients, colleagues, and co-workers. Increase productivity and streamline collaboration with others via shared files that show your markings and highlights. This superlative tool is durable, portable, and easy to use, with a user-friendly screen that reflects ambient light for easy legibility both indoors and out. Digital Paper makes an ideal complement to laptops and tablets.

Read and work on new documents or archives in sharp,

easy-to-read text and graphics, full letter size, so you

never need to scroll to read.¹ Digital Paper has a 13.3″

display that renders full-page letter-size (8.5″ x 11″)

documents in PDF format.

Just like writing with pen on paper, use the stylus to write

fluidly and directly on the panel, as well as easily highlight

and erase text. You have the same ease of movement,

plus the surface rejects your palm, so functionality is

never disrupted, the way it is on regular tablets.

Since files can be stored in a document repository,

you can collaborate with colleagues who need to work on

the same files or save your documents to the archives.

Using a service² like Box.com, Digital Paper lets you transfer your documents to and from the Cloud – wirelessly. Then view them, annotations and all, on any other device of your choosing, whether it’s a tablet, PC, Mac, or smartphone. So you can read, annotate, and save a PDF, then share it with your colleagues via your Box.com account.

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iWatch reportedly set to debut in September–Gizmag

You can carry a privacy-minded wireless hotspot in your pocket–engadget

Devices like the Safeplug can deter companies and governments from snooping on your devices at home, but they’re not much good when you’re on the road. That’s where the PORTAL (Personal Onion Router To Assure Liberty) project comes into play. Load the customized firmware on to certain travel hotspots (some TP-Link models and their clones) and you can maintain strong privacy anywhere you have internet access, without using special software; think of it as an anti-surveillance tool in your pocket. It not only puts you on the Tor anonymity network that spies hate so much, but supports connection masking add-ons that prevent your Tor data from being blocked. You can visit China without worrying that you’ll have to use an insecure, heavily censored connection just to get online.

Read about the main drawback in the rest of the article.

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Pogoplug’s new Safeplug anonymizes all your home’s web browsing for $49-Engadget

Lawyers Won’t Lose Clients to DIY Legal Services=Lawyerist

Sam Glover:

Currently, consumers can pick from a range of options for do-it-yourself legal services. You can get a divorce at OfficeMax, a will from Amazon, and dissolve a partnership with LegalZoom. Those are just a few examples, of course. There are hundreds of DIY legal documents available online and offline.

People who want to do their own legal work are, naturally, not likely to hire a lawyer in the first place. And people who hire lawyers do not want to do their own legal work.

Read Sam’s entire piece and find out why he thinks “…now is not the time to panic…”.

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Why surveillance companies hate the iPhone – The Washington Post

By Craig Timberg

The secrets of one of the world’s most prominent surveillance companies, Gamma Group, spilled onto the Internet last week, courtesy of ananonymous leaker who appears to have gained access to sensitive corporate documents. And while they provide illuminating details about the capabilities of Gamma’s many spy tools, perhaps the most surprising revelation is about something the company is unable to do: It can’t hack into your typical iPhone.

Android phones, some Blackberries and phones running older Microsoft operating systems all are vulnerable to Gamma’s spyware, called FinSpy, which can turn your smart phone into a potent surveillance device. Users of the spyware are capable of listening to calls on targeted devices, stealing contacts, activating the microphone, tracking your location and more. But for FinSpy to hack into an iPhone, its owner must have already stripped away much of its built-in security through a process called “jailbreaking.” No jailbreak, no FinSpy on your iPhone, at least according to a leakedGamma document dated April 2014.

Read entire article.

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When Lawyers Go Electric – EVWORLD.COM

How many law offices do you know where nine of the attorney’s drive the exact same model electric car? Well, meet two of the lawyers at Arnall Golden Gregory in Atlanta who drive Nissan LEAF EVs after discovering they’re not only cheap of lease, cost $20 a month to recharge, and, maybe best of all, gives them free access to HOV lanes and toll roads.

See interview of Electric Lawyers.

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