You can carry a privacy-minded wireless hotspot in your pocket–engadget

Devices like the Safeplug can deter companies and governments from snooping on your devices at home, but they’re not much good when you’re on the road. That’s where the PORTAL (Personal Onion Router To Assure Liberty) project comes into play. Load the customized firmware on to certain travel hotspots (some TP-Link models and their clones) and you can maintain strong privacy anywhere you have internet access, without using special software; think of it as an anti-surveillance tool in your pocket. It not only puts you on the Tor anonymity network that spies hate so much, but supports connection masking add-ons that prevent your Tor data from being blocked. You can visit China without worrying that you’ll have to use an insecure, heavily censored connection just to get online.

Read about the main drawback in the rest of the article.

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Pogoplug’s new Safeplug anonymizes all your home’s web browsing for $49-Engadget

Lawyers Won’t Lose Clients to DIY Legal Services=Lawyerist

Sam Glover:

Currently, consumers can pick from a range of options for do-it-yourself legal services. You can get a divorce at OfficeMax, a will from Amazon, and dissolve a partnership with LegalZoom. Those are just a few examples, of course. There are hundreds of DIY legal documents available online and offline.

People who want to do their own legal work are, naturally, not likely to hire a lawyer in the first place. And people who hire lawyers do not want to do their own legal work.

Read Sam’s entire piece and find out why he thinks “…now is not the time to panic…”.

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Why surveillance companies hate the iPhone – The Washington Post

By Craig Timberg

The secrets of one of the world’s most prominent surveillance companies, Gamma Group, spilled onto the Internet last week, courtesy of ananonymous leaker who appears to have gained access to sensitive corporate documents. And while they provide illuminating details about the capabilities of Gamma’s many spy tools, perhaps the most surprising revelation is about something the company is unable to do: It can’t hack into your typical iPhone.

Android phones, some Blackberries and phones running older Microsoft operating systems all are vulnerable to Gamma’s spyware, called FinSpy, which can turn your smart phone into a potent surveillance device. Users of the spyware are capable of listening to calls on targeted devices, stealing contacts, activating the microphone, tracking your location and more. But for FinSpy to hack into an iPhone, its owner must have already stripped away much of its built-in security through a process called “jailbreaking.” No jailbreak, no FinSpy on your iPhone, at least according to a leakedGamma document dated April 2014.

Read entire article.

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When Lawyers Go Electric – EVWORLD.COM

How many law offices do you know where nine of the attorney’s drive the exact same model electric car? Well, meet two of the lawyers at Arnall Golden Gregory in Atlanta who drive Nissan LEAF EVs after discovering they’re not only cheap of lease, cost $20 a month to recharge, and, maybe best of all, gives them free access to HOV lanes and toll roads.

See interview of Electric Lawyers.

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Cooking Dinner tonight – 8/3/14 on Livestream-Nicole Black

 

Niki Black, cloud pioneer and legal tech whiz, loves to cook.  One of her most popular features over the years has been her photos of dinner.  Niki has an internet fan club around the world for those photos and recipes.  [For some reason, she is very popular in Japan].

Nike “…takes it up a notch…” (with apologies to Emeril) technologically as she uses her brand new, complimentary Google Glass to LiveStream her dinner preparation.

If you are thinking of exploring the possibilities of Google Glass for your practice, watch Niki learn to use this new tool.  The possibilities for depositions, demonstrations, trial, etc, are numerous.

Nicole Black does dinner using her Google Glass.

 

Early impressions: Amazon Fire Phone–Gizmag

 

By Will Shanklin

Apple launched the iPhone seven years ago. The first flagship Android phones hit the scene four and a half years ago. Hell, even Windows Phone has been around for over three years. But now Amazon is launching its first smartphone in mid-2014. Though we aren’t yet ready to publish our full review, we have the Amazon Fire Phone in house and have some early thoughts.

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So how does Amazon try to differentiate its flagship smartphone when it’s this late in the game? Well, the answer appears to be with gimmicks.

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Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited Service Is Now Official | Ubergizmo

 

By Tyler Lee

A few days ago, it was reported that Amazon was planning on introducing an unlimited Kindle service. Basically it involves users subscribing to the Kindle Unlimited service at $9.99 a month and gain access to pretty much the entire Kindle library at Amazon. Sounds like a good deal, right?

Well if you’re an avid reader and you think that you will be able to make your money worthwhile, you might be pleased to learn that Amazon has officially launched the Kindle Unlimited service. The information seems to the same as what we saw the other day, which was pretty much Amazon announcing it ahead of it.

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Read Tyler Lee’s complete post here.

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EDITOR’S NOTE:  Kindle Unlimited has its own “Free” buttons on Amazon; i.e., when you find a book you want, be careful to choose the Kindle Unlimited

Free”  button–not the “One-Click” or other buttons.  If you use “One-Click”, you will be charged and have to figure out how to cancel the order.

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Today’s Tech: How A California Personal Injury Attorney Uses Google Glass -Niki Black

From:  « Above the Law: A Legal Web Site – News, Commentary, and Opinions on Law Firms, Lawyers, Law Schools, Law Suits, Judges and Courts + Career Resources

 

 Meet Mitch Jackson, a California personal injury attorney, and learn how he uses the wearable technology Google Glass in his law firm.

 

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It turns out, Mitch is realistic about the limitations of Google Glass in its present state. Even so, he believes that investing time into learning how to use it now it will pay off. “I see it as a short- and long-term play. How practical is it in the practice of catastrophic injury and death cases? It’s not quite there yet,” he admits. “Of course I could do some — but not all — of the things I use Glass for using my smartphone. But wearable mobile technology is the future, in my opinion. So that’s why I’m using it now — to get comfortable with it. I want to be at the forefront of where the technology is going. That way I’ll understand how it needs to improve and how I can use it in my practice to improve the client experience and give me an edge over my competitors. That’s why I’m incorporating Google Glass into my workflow as much as I can.”

Despite the newness of Google Glass, Mitch is implementing it into his law practice as much as possible and hopes to use it during trial in the near future. “I’ve used it to record interviews of witnesses and during depositions to videotape the proceeding so that my client can watch it later,” he says. “And, I was planning to use Glass earlier this year in two jury trials, with the consent of the judge and opposing counsel, but both cases settled. I must admit that although I’m glad we were able to resolve the cases, I was a bit disappointed in not having the opportunity to use Glass during trial.”

When I asked how Mitch expects to use Google Glass during trial, he replied: “In the near future, and subject to court approval, I hope to use Glass to pick my juries and examine witnesses. For example, I anticipate picking a jury here in California and use Glass to confidentially interact in real time with my jury consultant back in New York. Based upon the responses and body language she observes from the real-time feed, she can share follow-up questions and concerns via my ear bud. Information and issues she finds in her database searches that I need to know about will be discreetly displayed to my Google Glass screen.”

Another way that he uses Google Glass is to communicate with clients. “I use Google Glass to stay connected with my clients and stay on top of my calendar and social media. Each new client is added to my Glass contact list and throughout the course of the day I can easily monitor and respond to inquiries regardless of where I am or what I’m doing,” he explains. “For example, I’ll use the camera function of Google Glass to share real-time images and videos with clients while working on pleadings or taking the deposition of a witnesses. They enjoy getting an update with me holding up a finished pleading or settlement check and tell me that they appreciate the extra effort and prompt service.”

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Read Niki’s entire article about Mitch’s use of Google Glass here.

 

 

 

 

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2 Arrested For Flying Drone Close To New York Police Chopper–Ubergizmo

 

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While the Federal Aviation Administration has until next year to come up with rules that govern the use of drones in the National Airspace System there’s no denying the fact that drones have already taken to the skies. Available for a couple of hundred dollars, with models offering better altitude and range costing thousands, its fairly easy for anyone to get their hands on a drone.

This means that inevitably there would be a situation where someone lands in trouble even when they think they aren’t doing anything wrong. That’s exactly what happened to Wilkins Mendoza and Remy Castro who were arrested for flying a DJI Phantom 2 drone too close to a New York Police helicopter.

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Read entire Ubergizmo report here.

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